Industrial Ventilation

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Introduction to Design of Industrial Ventilation Systems
Course No: D02-001 Credit: 2 PDH

J. Paul Guyer, P.E., R.A., Fellow ASCE, Fellow AEI

Continuing Education and Development, Inc. 9 Greyridge Farm Court Stony Point, NY 10980 P: (877) 322-5800 F: (877) 322-4774 info@cedengineering.com

An Introduction  to Design of  Industrial  Ventilation   Systems    Guyer Partners
44240 Clubhouse Drive El Macero, CA 95618 (530)7758-6637 jpguyer@pacbell.net

J. Paul Guyer, P.E., R.A.
Paul Guyer is a registered civil engineer, mechanical engineer, fire protection engineer, and architect with over 35 years experience in the design of buildings and related infrastructure. For an additional 9 years he was a senior-level advisor to the California Legislature. He is a graduate of Stanford University and has held numerous national, state and local positions with the American Society of Civil Engineers and National Society of Professional Engineers.

© J. Paul Guyer 2009

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This course is adapted from the Unified Facilities Criteria of the United States government, which is in the public domain, has unlimited distribution and is not copyrighted.

© J. Paul Guyer 2009

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CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 GENERAL CRITERIA 1.2 DESIGN PROCEDURE 1.3 DESIGN CRITERIA 1.4 CONTROLS 1.5 OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS 1.6 COMMISSIONING

2. WOOD SHOP FACILITIES 2.1 FUNCTION 2.2 OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS 2.3 FLOOR PLAN LAYOUT 2.4 DESIGN CRITERIA 2.5 SAFETY AND HEALTH CONSIDERATIONS

3. PAINT SPRAY BOOTHS 3.1 FUNCTION 3.2 OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS 3.3 DESIGN CRITERIA 3.4 FANS AND MOTORS 3.5 REPLACEMENT AIR 3.6 SYSTEM CONTROLS 3.7 RESPIRATORY PROTECTION

© J. Paul Guyer 2009

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1. INTRODUCTION This is a general introduction to the design of industrial ventilation systems, with an additional discussion of two of the more common industrial ventilation applications: wood shops and paint spray booths.

1.1 GENERAL CRITERIA. Installing engineering controls is the preferred method of controlling hazardous processes as specified in 29 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 1910.1000(e), Air Contaminants. Properly designed industrial ventilation systems are the most common form of engineering controls.

1.2 DESIGN PROCEDURE. Refer to the ACGIH (American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists) IV Manual, Industrial Ventilation; A Manual of Recommended Practice, for system design calculations. Design all industrial ventilation systems in accordance with the paragraphs below.

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Step 1. Identify all significant contaminant sources that require ventilation control. Request the local industrial hygiene office to provide a source characterization with area diagrams of the contaminant sources, and employee work areas. Also, consider how the system being designed might affect the performance of any existing processes, industrial ventilation systems or HVAC systems.



Step 2. Consider how the facility is to be used or expanded in the future. It may be possible to initially specify fans that are capable of handling future needs at minimal increased cost.



Step 3. Select or design the exhaust hood that best suits the work piece or operation. Design the exhaust hood to enclose the work piece or operation as much as possible. This will reduce the ventilation rates required to provide contaminant control. This UFC provides optimum exhaust hood designs for many of the operations covered.



Step 4. Determine the capture velocity required to control generated contaminants. Capture velocities are specified assuming there are no cross drafts or turbulence that adversely affects the capture efficiency. Reduce potential for cross drafts or turbulence near a given exhaust hood by properly locating and designing the hood with baffles, and also by designing the replacement air system to complement the exhaust system.



Step 5. Determine the exhaust volumetric flow, in cubic feet per...
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