Human Resource Management in Mang Inasal

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MEDICAL MYTHS AND QUACK PRACTICES AT BARANGAY
MALAININ, SAN ROQUE, NAIC, CAVITE
AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS ON THE
HEALTH CARE PROCESS
 
 
 
 
 
A Thesis
 
 
 
 
In Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the Degree
Bachelor of Science in Nursing
 
 
 
 
 
October 2007
Chapter 1
The Problem and its Background
 
Introduction
            Complementary and alternative medicines, including medical myths and quack practices fundamentally rooted on the medical systems and techniques of ancient people such as Chinese, Egyptians, Greeks, Asian Indians ad Native Americans.   Contemporary biomedical research has tended to be skeptical and sometimes contemptuous of these alternative, non-allopathic methods of medical practices. Yet medical myths and quack practices has historically contributed for many people's sense of health and well-being over the centuries and still does in many countries, most notably, Philippines. The Philippines is one of the many Asian countries with many beliefs, cultural practices, and traditions. Part of the beliefs is the existence of medicinal myths and quack practices. According to (2000) medical myths and quack practices in medicines are considered as familiar objects in the nation. Specifically, the Philippine comprises different communities which have different medical myths and quack practices.             Primarily, the main goal of this research is to identify various medical myths and quack practices in one of the community or barangay in Cavite, specifically the study will be conducted in Barangay Malainin, San Roque, Naic Cavite. Furthermore, the study will also determine the influence of medical myths and quack practices in the health care process. It is possible both to keep an open mind about "traditional" medicinal belief and quack practices while at the same time taking care scientifically to evaluate its efficacy. In many countries somewhere 30% to 40% of people turn to believe in medical myths and quack practices. This fact says something important about a lack of faith in now-established scientific medicine—as well as an eagerness to find more satisfying modes of treatment and care than are provided by mainline Western models of health care. It signals a need to attend to what alternative medicine offers patients. A focus on the mind-body relationship, elusive yet central to human nature, is appropriately a research subject for both scientific medicine and medical myths and quack practices (1999).             With time constraints dictated by managed care initiatives, client demands, and movement toward brief therapy, growing number individuals seek the help of people who perform quack practices or aid their sickness through medical myths. The medical practices today typically denotes a technique regarded by Western medicine as scientifically tenuous or used as an adjunct to more orthodox medical methods (1997). Much of the philosophy behind this scientific medical practicesis drawn from Ayurvedic or Eastern Indian medicine, curandismo or cuentas, Native American Shamanism, and Far Eastern philosophies (1998). The shared link among these medical modalities is the holistic approach to physical and mental wellness: that mind, body, and spirit are interconnected and wellness depends on equilibrium between these three components ( 1997).             According to some studies, medical myths and quack practices is a broad domain of healing resources that encompasses all health systems, modalities, and practices and their accompanying theories and beliefs, other than those intrinsic to the politically dominant health system of a particular society or culture in a given historical perspective. Medical myths and quack practices include all such practices and ideas self-defined by their users as preventing or treating illness or promoting health and well-being. The main context of medical myths and quack practices is to relieve pain, postpone death, and make money. Most...
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