Human Memory Organization.

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Human Memory Organization.

Human memory organization, from the outside, seems to be quite a difficult thing to analyse, and even more difficult to explain in black and white. This is because of one main reason, no two humans are the same, and from this it follows that no two brains are the same.

However, after saying that, it must be true that everyone's memory works in roughly the same way, otherwise we would not be the race called humans. The way the memory is arranged, is probably the most important part of our bodies, as it is our memory that controls us.

I think that it is reasonable to suggest that our memory is ordered in some way, and it is probably easy to think of it as three different sections : short term, medium term, and long term memory.

Short Term : This is where all of the perceptions we get come to. From the eyes, nose, ears, nerves etc. They come in at such a rate, that there needs to be a part of memory that is fast, and can sift through all of these signals, and then pass them down the line for use, or storage. Short term memory probably has no real capacity for storage.

Medium Term :This is where all of the information from the short term memory comes to be processed. It analyses it, and then decides what to do with it (use it, or store it). Here also is where stored information is called to for processing when needed. This kind of memory has some kind of limited storage space, which is used when processing information, however the trade-off is that is slower than Short term memory.

Long Term :Long term memory is the dumping ground for all of the used information. Here is where the Medium term memory puts, and takes it's information to and from. It has a large amount of space, but is relatively slow in comparison with the other kinds of memory, and the way that the memory is stored is dubious as we are all knows to forget things.

There is quite a good analogy in Sommerfield (forth edition p24-p25). Short term memory...
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