Handling Conflict

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Handling Conflict
According to our text, Management Leading and Collaborating in a Competitive World, by Thomas Bateman and Scott Snell, there are five approaches to handling conflict. The five approaches are avoidance, accommodation, competition, compromise, and collaboration. Handling conflict through avoidance is simply not addressing the problem or acknowledging there is a problem. Basically, nothing is being done to satisfy either party. Handling conflict through accommodation is when someone cooperates “on behalf of the other party but not being assertive about one‘s own interests.” Handling conflict with compromise “involves moderate attention to both parties’ concerns, being neither highly cooperative nor highly assertive.” Handling conflict from the approach of competing is when “people focus strictly on their own wishes and are unwilling to recognize the other person’s concerns.” The last approach to handling conflict is collaborations. “Collaboration emphasizes both cooperation and assertiveness to maximize both parties’ satisfaction.”

“Effective conflict management should reflect the advice offered by Mary Parker Follett some sixty years ago. She argued that one ought not to conceive conflict as a wasteful outbreak of incompatibilities, but a normal process whereby socially valuable differences register themselves for the enrichment for all concerned.” (Treslan) Conflict should be handled differently, based on the situation and those who are involved.

In order to handle conflict more effectively, I think both parties should feel the benefit of the resolution. “People feel they have benefited from a conflict when (1) a new solution is implemented, the problem is solved, and it is unlikely to emerge again, and (2) work relationships have been strengthened and people believe they can work together productively in the future.” (Bateman and Snell) One way to effectively handle conflict is by being a mediator.

Acting as a mediator is intervening...
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