Hairs

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  • Topic: Hair, Protein, Disulfide bond
  • Pages : 1 (320 words )
  • Download(s) : 78
  • Published : February 19, 2013
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Because curly hair has a tendency to be dryer, more brittle and prone to frizz it requires more careful treatment than straight hair to keep it looking its best. First let’s find out what makes hair curly in the first place. There is more than one school of thought on this subject. Some hair scholars believe whether your hair is straight or curly depends on the shape of the hair shaft, which is determined by the shape of the hair follicle. A cross section view of a straight hair would appear round, while a similar view of a curly hair would appear oval. This shape is determined by a genetic pre-disposition. Others believe that hair is curly or straight, depending upon the number of disulfide bonds between hair proteins found in the hair shaft. The idea is that the greater the number of links between sulphur atoms, the curlier the hair, conversely, the fewer the number of links, the straighter the hair. I think both opinions are correct. The shape of the follicle would account for the curl, and the higher number of disulfide bonds also known as sulphur bonds would account for its dry, brittle texture. Now that we know why our curly locks are dry and brittle and require special treatment what exactly should we do about it? Always use a gentle shampoo, preferably a sulfate-free [->0]formulation, and use a daily hydrating conditioner[->1] when you wash your hair. Wash your hair every other day instead of everyday, but use just conditioner on the days that you don’t shampoo. Apply the conditioner as you would a shampoo and rinse well. Although they do not lather conditioners do have some cleansing ability. I received a letter from a reader who has taken this concept to the extrem

[->0] - http://www.trihaircare.com/tri24/sb/graphics/sulfatefree.html [->1] - https://www.trihaircare.com/index.php?cPath=24_56_63
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