Guide to Measuring Hse Performance

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A GUIDE TO MEASURING
HEALTH & SAFETY
PERFORMANCE
December 2001
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MEASURING HEALTH AND SAFETY PERFORMANCE
Contents
Introduction
How will this guidance help me?
What the guidance is not
Why is guidance necessary?
Why measure performance?
Introduction
Providing information
Answering questions
Decision making
Addressing different information needs
What to measure
Introduction
Measuring the hazard burden
Measuring the health and safety management system
Measuring failure - reactive monitoring
Measuring the health and safety culture
Planning and implementing - a more detailed look
When to measure performance
Who should measure performance
How to measure performance
Introduction
Deriving performance measures
References
Further information
Feedback
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INTRODUCTION
This new document developed by HSE provides practical guidance for people who understand the principles of health and safety management and wish to improve the measurement of health and safety performance in their organisations. We would welcome feedback on the ideas presented here. The guidance on measuring health and safety performance is organised under these main headings:

· Why measure?
· What to measure.
· When to measure.
· Who should measure.
· How to measure.
The guidance expands on the Measuring performance chapter in HSE's publication HSG65 Successful health and safety management,1 which provides guidance on managing health and safety. The chapter Planning and implementing from HSG 65 has been included with this guidance to provide background information which will put it into context. You may find it useful to read this chapter first.

How will this guidance help me?
Measuring health and safety is not easy and there are no simple answers. But this guidance provides:
· HSE’s emerging views on this dynamic and important subject; · information to help you improve your organisation’s health and safety performance measurement; and
· an opportunity for HSE to share ideas with others across the world. We would like to capture your views and experience in order to develop and expand the ideas further.
There are key questions which the most senior managers in an organisation should be asking themselves. These are:
What information is available to assure me that throughout the organisation arrangements to control health and safety risks:
· are in place;
· comply with the law as a minimum; and
· operate effectively?
This guidance aims to give you some useful information to help you address these questions. It provides:
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· a framework for measuring health and safety performance; · guidance on developing health and safety performance measures relevant to your organisation; and
· useful references to information sources on performance measurement generally, including tools and techniques.
What the guidance is not
This guidance does not provide:
· a simple checklist for measuring health and safety management; · a simple answer to the question ‘how do we measure our health and safety performance?’; or
· a definitive list of health and safety performance measures suitable for all organisations.
Why is guidance necessary?
Measurement is a key step in any management process and forms the basis of continual improvement. If measurement is not carried out correctly, the effectiveness of the health and safety management system is undermined and there is no reliable information to inform managers how well the health and safety risks are controlled.

In the UK, the HSC and Government’s Revitalising Health and Safety2 strategy and the requirements of the Turnbull Report3 on corporate governance provide a renewed focus on health and safety performance and the control of health and safety risks.

Although there is much information available on performance measurement generally, there is little which looks at health and safety in particular which organisations can apply to their own circumstances.

HSE’s...
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