Good Leadership and Good Governance of a Country

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Good governance
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Part of a series on
Governance
Models

Collaborative
Good
Multistakeholder
Open-source
Private

By level

Local
Global

By field

Climate
Clinical
Corporate
Data
Earth system
Ecclesiastical
Environmental
Higher education
Information
Network
Ocean
Political party
Project
Self
Service-oriented architecture
Soil
Technology
Transnational
Website

Measures

World Governance Index
Sustainable Governance Indicators

Related topics

Chief governance officer
Governance, risk management
and compliance
e-governance
Environmental, social and
corporate governance
Market governance mechanism

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Good governance is an indeterminate term used in international development literature to describe how public institutions conduct public affairs and manage public resources. Governance is "the process of decision-making and the process by which decisions are implemented (or not implemented)".[1] The term governance can apply to corporate, international, national, local governance[1] or to the interactions between other sectors of society.

The concept of "good governance" often emerges as a model to compare ineffective economies or political bodies with viable economies and political bodies.[2] The concept centers around the responsibility of governments and governing bodies to meet the needs of the masses as oposed to select groups in society. Because the governments treated in the contemporary world as most "successful" are often liberal democratic states concentrated in Europe and the Americas, those countries' institutions often set the standards by which to compare other states' institutions when talking about governance.[2] Because the term good governance can be focused on any one form of governance, aid organizations and the authorities of developed countries often will focus the meaning of good governance to a set of requirement that conform to the organizations agenda, making "good governance" imply many different things in many different contexts.[3][4][5] Contents

1 Forms
2 Reform and standards
2.1 IMF
2.2 UN
2.3 World Bank
3 Effects
3.1 International humanitarian funding
3.2 Democratization
3.2.1 Example
4 Role of political parties
5 Scholarly approaches
6 Criticism
7 See also
8 References
8.1 Book sources
9 External links

Forms

In international affairs, analysis of good governance can look at any of the following relationships:[3]

between governments and markets,
between governments and citizens,
between governments and the private or voluntary sector, between elected officials and appointed officials,
between local institutions and urban and rural dwellers, between legislature and executive branches, and
between nation states and institutions.

The varying types of comparisons comprising the analysis of governance in scholastic and practical discussion can cause the meaning of "good governance" to vary greatly from practitioner to practitioner.[3] Reform and standards

Three institutions can be reformed to promote good governance: the state, the private sector and civil society.[6] However, amongst various cultures, the need and demand for reform can vary depending on the priorities of that country's society.[7] A variety of country level initiatives and international movements put emphasis on various types of governance reform. Each movement for reform establishes criteria for what they consider good governance based on their own needs and agendas. The following are examples of good governance standards for prominent organizations in the international community. IMF

See also:...
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