Going Beyond the Border

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Communication in Theological View: A Communication between God and Man Communication has been an important issue ever since the creation of the earth. Ever since God created the world, man has sought to communicate. However, after Adam and Eve sinned, man could no longer communicate with God. Yet, God had a plan for this problem and sent His Son, Jesus Christ, to bridge the gap between God and man. After the Tower of Babel, man had trouble communicating with his fellow man. Man now had to find new ways to communicate. Early on, written languages were developed. Later on, the writing process was facilitated by the invention of the printing press. Eventually, communion became even easier with the invention of the telegraph which led to the telephone and eventually to the invention of the Internet. Each of this invention came along in God's perfect timing in preparation for when Christians "shall see Him face to face".

Imagine a world where everyone spoke the same language. Although it seems nearly seven billion people are building that future, it was the world of the ancient past that experienced a universal language. Suddenly, new languages emerged. Isolated populations developed writing as diverse as Aryan Sanskrit pressed into clay or Incan Quipi, tying knots in a rope to communicate ideas. Communications have changed drastically over the years. Now messages are sent by telephone wire, radio wave, and fiber optic cables. A global network offers overnight packages and speed of light communication. What does scripture say about man's communication with his fellow man and his creator? How have advancements in technology allowed for the development of a global economy and the spread of the knowledge of God? In scripture, we see that God had created speech before man came on the scene. By the word of His mouth, he spoke, and the things of the earth were created. When God had created the first man, it was not good for him to be alone, so God created women. The first recorded words of Adam are ""This is now bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh; She shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man." (Genesis 2:23) Man and woman spoke 2

the same language and perfectly understood each other because sin had not yet entered the world. When Satan tempted Eve at the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, he immediately began by undermining God's word and authority by saying, "Has God indeed said, "You shall not eat of every tree of the garden'?" (Genesis 3:1) With further trickery and false communication from "the father of lies" (Satan), Eve ate of the fruit and offered it to Adam. It was from this sin that the most tragic communication breakdown ever occurred. God had walked with Adam in the garden and now when he sought Adam out, Adam and Eve hid. When God questioned them, Adam replied, "I heard your voice in the garden, and I was afraid because I was naked; and I hid myself." (Genesis 3:10) For the first time, man's prefect communication with God was flawed, never to be the same again on this earth. Forevermore, man was to be separated from God by this gap, known as sin. A holy God could not have intimacy with unholy man. It would require a perfect mediator, or go between, but the whole world had been corrupted, so who could bridge this gap? As man multiplied again after the global flood of Noah's time, "the whole earth had one language and one speech" (Genesis 11:1). Man began to try to build a tower to "make a name" for themselves and reach the heavens. Yet scripture gives this account of the miraculous end to such folly. What does the Tower of Babel story imply about a worldwide language of English? But the LORD came down to see the city and the tower which the sons of men had built. And the LORD said, "Indeed the people are one and they all have one language, and this is what they begin to do; now nothing that they propose to do will be withheld from them. Come,...
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