Fire in Rome in 64 Ad and the Deaths of Peter and Paul Roman Fire in 64 Ad

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Fire in Rome in 64 AD and the Deaths of Peter and Paul Roman Fire in 64 AD

Table of Contents

Fire in Rome in 64 AD……………………………………………………………………….…...1 Death of the Apostle Peter…………………………...…………………………………………...2 Death of the Apostle Paul.…………..……………………………………………………….…...4 References…………………………………………………….…………………………….…….7

Fire in Rome in 64 AD and the Deaths 1
Fire in Rome in 64 AD and the Deaths of Peter and Paul Roman Fire in 64 AD

In 64 AD, Rome was under the kingship of Caesar Nero who reigned until 68 AD. At his time, the region was experiencing flaring environmental temperatures such that Nero had moved his dwelling to the city of Antium that was located alongside the coastal line and thereby being cooler. The fire started during the night in the area of Circus Maximus yet to the Roman natives who often experienced such fires ignited by the soaring temperatures during the summer period, it would not have been a major issue if it had been controlled. However, the fire spread easily to an extensive area of Rome due to the strong dry winds such that the inferno lasted for six days. Seventy five percent of Rome was razed in this fire (Harris, 2008). Messengers were dispatched to the Caesar to inform him about the fire; and he responded fast by moving back to the area while still enquiring for more assistance from his superiors. The fire’s source has never been identified although at the given time, Roman natives held the ground that Nero had ordered for the city’s razing in order to wipe out the dismal housing structures that the biggest part of the city covered because most of the Roman citizens were very poor. In their stead, the Caesar had proposed to erect his majestic villas and gazebos (Joy, 2009).

Tacitus in his publication known as the Annals offers this account and supports the view that the fire had been instigated by the Caesar (Ussher, 2003). Being a native of Rome at the given time, Tacitus claims that a few men were bribed by the emperor to start the fire while making others believe that they were intoxicated with wine. Once the city was ablaze, the Caesar availed himself in the Tower of Maecenas where he had a panoramic view of the blaze. His spirits were soaring high such that he danced with glee while singing and dancing to music from a lyre. Roman dwellers peddled the news that the blaze was indirectly initiated by the Caesar and

Fire in Rome in 64 AD and the Deaths 2
tensions rose among the masses. In a bid to calm the inhabitants, Caesar Nero blamed the fire on the Christian sect and proceeded to persecute them to pacify the masses. Christians were paraded in auditoriums where they were fed to vicious dogs and lions and others were dipped in wax and lit as human torches. This served as the initial phase of Christian persecution and martyrdom within Rome, lasting up to 68 AD.

The Death of Apostle Peter

Early historical accounts have indicated that the Apostle Peter during the latter part of his earthly life was in Rome where he was martyred. Although the Bible has no account of his death, various early scholars have applied themselves to establishing the mode, period and the geographical setting in which he demised. In the book of John, Peter’s manner of death is accounted for in chapter twenty-one, verses eighteen and nineteen. This phrase infers the pre-supposition that Christians living slightly at the beginning of the second century had an understanding of his death. Peter wrote his first Biblical account while living in Rome as he has mentioned the city of Babylon at the end of the text; in context, the city of Babylon that Peter was referring to was located in Rome since the one that had been instituted in Euphrates had been abolished while the other was located in Egypt.

Bishop Papias and Clement of Alexandria, both residents of Rome within the early period, gave an...
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