Environmental Psychology

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Environmental Psychology
People behave differently depending on the environment that they are exposed to or are physically in. Each environment setting yields different behavioral results that are similar among-st the people in such environment. To better understand environmental psychology it is important to understand that the definition is substantial to many environmental settings that humans have. Although conservation psychology, social Psychology and environmental psychology can work together in understanding human behavior within their surroundings, there is a difference among each and a purpose for each that have differences. Research in environmental psychology has produced many theories and explanation to human behavior. Defining Environmental Psychology

People tend to be rajasik in cold climates, “rajasik” meaning people in cold climates have to organize and prepare to stay warm. People in such climates are energetic, aggressive, manipulative, competitive, and intelligence. People in cold climate are defined as controlling and energetic because of they are having to go into survival mode to stay warm. People in warm climates are more reserved and lazy, thus they tend to have a surrendering attitude and fear activity (Mathews Ph.D., 2001).

Environmental psychology explains and studies the relationship between humans and the many environments humans are exposed to. People can be examined and studied in environments that include social settings, learning settings, information settings, and natural settings. The study of environmental psychology is the comparison and study of human’s behavior in relation to their physical environment (Mathews Ph.D., 2001). The way people interact with their world and how this interaction shapes our behavior is considered the discipline of environmental psychology. Conservative, Social, and Environmental Psychology Contrast/Comparison

Conservation psychology: According to "Conservation Psychology" (2011), “How...
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