Employment Relations in Singapore

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Table of Contents
1. Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………..1 2. Employment Relations in Singapore …………………………………………………………1 3.1 Gender Wage Gap ……………………………………………………………………1 3.2 Existence of Gender Wage Gap ………………………………………………………2 3.3.1 Compensation Differential …………………………………………..………2 3.3.2 Family Role Constraints …………………………………………………….2 3. Employment Relations Worldwide …………………………………………………………..3 4. Equity in Employment Relations …………………………………………………………….3 5.3 Economic Rationalism ……………………………………………………………….3 5.4 Civil Libertarianism and Equal Employment Opportunity …………………………..4 5.5 Social Justice …………………………………………………………………………4 5. Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………………5 6. References ……………………………………………………………………………………6

1.

1. Introduction
Equity is about ensuring that all people have the supports that they need to access, participate and achieve to the same level in the organization (Skills Tasmania 2003). This then raises the question “Is employment relations in Singapore equitable?” Is it merely about rewarding talents regardless of race, gender or abilities? Some might also consider large wage disparities, increasing poverty rates, high unemployment rates and large numbers of injuries and illness at work as inconsistent with fairness and equity (Petzall, Abbott & Timo 2007). Employment equity is adopted as an ongoing planning process in organizations today to identify and eliminate barriers in the organization’s employment procedures and policies, put into place policies and practices to ensure that the effects of systemic barriers are eliminated, and to ensure appropriate representation of all group members throughout their workforce (York University 2010). This essay will look at employment relations in Singapore, and identify the different approaches taken towards equity.

2. Employment Relations in Singapore

3.1 Gender Wage Gap
Wage, income or earning refers to the repatriation given to individuals for the provision of their labour in a productive process within a formal economy (Jacob & Steinberg 1995). The gender wage gap is a phenomenon based in societies that formally employ and pay both male and female labour. Reactions of different extremes have been received; where the conservatives argue that the wage gap is a necessary feature of a functioning modern society, and the feminists who feel that the gender wage gap is detrimental to society and seek to eradicate such inequality. It is undeniable that women are becoming better educated, hence making more headway in the labour market. From 1975 to 1998, female labour force participation has increased from 34.9% to 51.3%, whilst male participation has dropped from 79.3% to 77.5% (Mukhopadhaya 2001: 552). In a more recent Labour Force Survey conducted by Ministry of Manpower (MOM), it showed that by 2007, female participation rate in the labour force has gone up to 54.3% (Ministry of Manpower 2011). The gender wage gap has also been narrowing, from 0.735 in 1981 to 0.754 in 1998 and to 0.82 in 2007 (Mukhopadhaya 2001: 560). Referring to the statistics across age and occupation, it is apparent that women are dominating feminized work which tend to pay lesser than management or professional occupations which are strongly dominated by men in age groups of 20-29. Looking at the wages of managers, the mean gross wage is $7,272 for females as compared to $9,065 for males (Ministry of Manpower 2011). These data show that men are paid more for the same job despite laws that call for equality and anti-discrimination in the workplace (TAFEP 2009). 3.2 Existence of Gender Wage Gap

There has been extensive study to explain the existence of such a disparity in the incomes of men and women. 2.2.1 Compensation Differential
Compensation differential is a term often used by labour economists who try to claim that extra pay are being given as...
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