Effects of Video Games on Teens

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Effects of Video Games on Teens

Video games are making teens more aggressive and violent. Our children are at danger. Are the teens of today in jeopardy of being outrageous and physiologically aroused? Are we producing a violent youth? What are video games doing to our kids other than providing entertainment? What can we except from the generations to come in this video-game overtaken era? In this research paper, I will be demonstrating how video games make teenagers violent and aggressive and how studies prove it. An in-depth discussion on the negative impacts of video games on teens will also be done along with the good it brings to our children’s minds. Video games have been around for few decades. Has it done any good other than providing entertainment? We will take a close look at the matter in this research paper. Views and facts provided by many renowned credentials show that video games make teens more aggressive and ruthless.

The existence of video games came into being from the past 30 years. It has been a favorite source of entertainment for kids. When board games and cartoons were replaced by a more supreme sort, called video games none could imagine the impacts it would bring upon the children. Video games became more interesting to kids than any other things, is because one could interact with the objects moving in the screen or have a control over something. Unlike cartoons, board games and toys, video games provided the teens a command and control scenario where they actually were a part of the virtual world. The first types of video games didn’t have ‘ill-effects’ on kids because they were strictly fictious and offered commands to be carried out. The visuals weren’t that good and it didn’t shape many thoughts in the gamers’ head. Games like Pac-Man, Mario Bros, and Tetris were just a pastime at the arcade. As the gaming world gradually moved forward the initiation of ‘violence and aggression in teens’ took place. The first of the violent kinds were Doom, Duke Nukem and such that gave the ability to kill people and objects. The blood and gore in video games gradually started to be seen and the teens are getting addicted to it. Violent games have been in the market for a long period of time but to be precise, the ultra-violent and lifelike video games have been in the markets since 2000s. The best sellers are always the violent ones. The kids love the war-fighting, zombie-killing and blood spilling games out there and the parents never mind buying them these games. The parents are making their kids out of control by doing this. Studies suggest that young adults who play the games become desensitized to the guts and gore - and more prone to aggressive behavior. In a study conducted by Dr. Bruce Bartholow, associate professor of psychology at University of Missouri, it shows how kids who play violent games show a lesser surprise or shock when they are shown acts of violence in real life. The test was carried out with 70 young adults given 25 minutes to play either a violent game or a non violent game. Later, violent and deadly images were shown to the kids and the ones who played violent games had a smaller brain response. This means that the kids would show no surprise or remorse when exposed to a violent situation and wouldn’t hesitate to be violent when they are regular gamers of violent games. This concludes that chances are high for a teen to engage in violent crimes as they are constantly exposed to it in video games. When a teen or kid is constantly exposed to something it either turns into a habit or takes regularity.

In another study by Gentile, Lynch, Linder & Walsh (2004, p.6), it is shown that average teens (boys) engage in a 13 hour per week of video gaming which is 8 hour more than an average girl’s gaming time. Girls show lesser interest in video games because the contents are less feminine in the game. The male teens learn a great deal on masculine...
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