Effects of Dota

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  • Topic: Laguna, Manila, Laguna de Bay
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MAJAYJAY, LAGUNA (MAHAYHAY)
LOCATION
Majayjay is a fourth class municipality in the province of Laguna, Philippines. It is located at the foot of Mount Banahaw, and stands 1,000 feet above sea level. It is 120 kilometres (75 mi) south of Manila, and bounded by the municipality of Magdalena on the north, by Lucban in Quezon province on the south, by Luisiana on the east, and by Liliw on the west. According to the latest census, it has a population of 24,791.

Majayjay is politically subdivided into 40 barangays.
* Amonoy
* Bakia
* Balanak
* Balayong
* Banilad
* Banti
* Bitaoy
* Botocan
* Bukal
* Burgos
* Burol
* Coralao
* Gagalot
* Ibabang Banga
* Ibabang Bayucain
* Ilayang Banga
* Ilayang Bayucain
* Isabang
* Malinao

* May-It
* Munting Kawayan
* Olla
* Oobi
* Origuel (Poblacion)
* Panalaban
* Pangil
* Panglan
* Piit
* Pook
* Rizal
* San Francisco (Poblacion)
* San Isidro
* San Miguel (Poblacion)
* San Roque
* Santa Catalina (Poblacion)
* Suba
* Talortor
* Tanawan
* Taytay
* Villa Nogales (Poblacion)

HISTORY

Indigenous residents use to call it Malay Barangay. The Spanish colonial government made it a town in 1578. During this period, Malay Barangay was one of the most populated settlements in the newly founded province. It competed with Bay and Pagsanjan during the selection of the province’s capital. The popularity of this new town grew instantly during the Spanish period. Its location at the foot of the mountain gave it an abundant supply of fresh mountain spring water. Four rivers flowed through the town. They were Initian, Oobi and Ula, from the towering mountain, and Balanac from the falls of Botocan where all the three rivers meet. Botocan Falls and the town’s breathtaking sceneries were uniquely famous. Europeans and wealthy natives from Manila frequently visited the town. However, the road to Malay Barangay was tough. Guests have to be ferried from Manila through the Pasig River to Laguna de Bay. Land travel began by mounting on horses through a path in the forest, and then borne by natives in hammocks on the way up to Malay Barangay. As to how Malay Barangay got its name Majayjay, residents assume that Spaniards found it difficult to pronounce Malay Barangay. Early colonizers may have shortened it to Malay-ay, until it became Majayjay. Legends, however say that it was the difficult journey to Majayjay, which gave the town its name. Tired travelers sighed, “Hay!” after scaling a cliff, “Hay!” after ascending a hill, and “Hay!” after crossing a raging river. Thus, guests referred to the place “Mahayhay,” meaning, many sighs. Spaniards spelled it “Majayjay.” Immediately after the conversion of the natives of Malay Barangay, a make shift church was built near May-it River. Fire destroyed it in 1578. Believers built a new church made of bamboo and cogon thatch to refurbish the former. However, fire again razed it to the ground. This time, the faithful built a stone church, but it again smoldered to ashes. The residents wondered. In spite of the repeated incidents of fire, the image of their Patron Saint, San Gregorio Papa Magno remained miraculously unscathed. Through the efforts of Padre Jose de Puertollano, contributions enforced from parishioners, and forced labor of the natives, a new elegant church rose in Majayjay. It took nineteen years, incalculable donations and countless lash marks that scarred the backs of languid natives to finish the church. The church’s completion in 1730 put it in the list of the most elegant churches in the province.

The St. Gregory Church

IN RETROSPECT, Christianizing Filipinos was the other side of Spanish conquest of the Philippines. Memories of this period are enshrined in colonial churches an Augustinian priest fondly calls angels in stones or messengers from heaven.

The 280-year-old St....
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