DTTLS Assignments

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DTTLS Essay 4.

Subject Knowledge and Understanding
← Demonstrate an understanding of the skills in literacy, numeracy and ICT which underpin your subject specialism. What skills (and levels) in these areas do your learners need?      

Skills:
Literacy – to read English for handouts.
Spoken – to understand English and follow verbal instructions, to understand feedback and give tutor information re: progress. Written – to complete enrolment forms, health forms, learning aims forms. Levels: beginners, all levels and improvers.

IT – access information online, email tutor, search for other classes/progression.

Demonstrate understanding of the general economic, social and personal issues relating to weak skills. Exercise with cards February 2nd  http://shop.niace.org.uk/media/catalog/product/a/7/a729_it_doesnt_get_any_better_english.pdf http://www.lifelonglearning.co.uk/mosergroup/rep03.htm                                                            

The British Government thought Literacy was important in 1870 when it introduced the first in a series of acts that would shape the British compulsory and free education system that we know today. The British government thought literacy was important for two reasons. The franchise was extended by the 1867 Reform bill and more people could vote. Literacy rates in Britain, in 1867, were 30%. Britain’s industrial production was falling behind countries, e.g. Germany, where literacy rates were higher. Victorians also thought that school would produce a more “civilized” workforce for the factories of the British Industrial Revolution. Ever more complicated machines required that their operators had the rudiments of education. Those early state schools taught reading, writing and arithmetic. Education in Britain has evolved since the 1870 Education Act but today historians recognize that Great Britain would not have become “Great” if the government not recognized that literacy was the key to economic growth. ACCI (2004): The importance of Literacy and Numeracy Skills Functional skills are the essential elements of English, mathematics and ICT that individuals need to enable them to engage successfully as citizens and progress to further learning or employment. Functional English, mathematics and ICT help learners reinforce skills in communication, problem solving, listening, time management and team working. This means that: Someone with Functional English at Level 2 should be able to write effectively, structure sentences and punctuate appropriately – for example to write a logical and persuasive letter or presentation to help them to get their point across when it matters most, or writing a successful job application. Someone with Functional mathematics at Level 2 should be able to use a range of data types and techniques to solve practical problems as well as check the accuracy of their solutions – for example to work out the total cost of materials for an art project at college or how much foreign currency they will get when they change their holiday money. Someone with Functional ICT at Level 2 will be able to manage and retrieve information, use a variety of applications and apply safety and security practices – for example to understand how to use a computer to produce a flyer for an event and create a mailing list for it using spreadsheet.

Beyond the obvious difficulties facing an illiterate person in modern times, such as few employment opportunities and the inability to effectively communicate, the gift to read impacts our society in very profound ways.  Not only would our society fail to exist as it does today if the ability to read and write was not so commonplace, literacy impacts the way we think and how we function as members of a community.  Without the ability to read and write, society could not effectively communicate and this would make cooperation on a global scale far too difficult. Furthermore, the vast majority of...
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