Domestic Violence

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Domestic Violence
Gregory Spahr
CRJ 308
Currie Gauvreau
October 31, 2010

Domestic violence is a social problem which continues to plague the nation, but through stricter law enforcement, improved hospital reporting technique, nationwide education and counseling, this problem can be reduced. Domestic violence has many different names such as, family violence, battering, wife beating, and domestic abuse. All these terms refer to the same thing, abuse by marital, common law, or a dating partner in an intimate relationship. Domestic violence is not only physical beating but mental abuse too. Verbal abuse is words that attack or injure an individual’s self-image, which eventually shatters one’s self-esteem. In this paper, I will discuss the many kinds of abuses against women, the reasons why women stay in these relationships, and possible solutions to diminish or reduce the problems of domestic violence. There are many forms of domestic violence but the more prevalent types that I will discuss are physical abuse, verbal abused, psychological abuse, sexual abuse, social abuse and economical abuse. Every nine seconds, a husband physically abuses his wife in the United States (Schwartz & Scott, 2003). Physical abuse is any action that is taken against another person that inflicts pain and harm in order to control or intimidate whether in public or private. Pushing, slapping, punching, biting, kicking are just some of the ways physical abuse is defined. The injury done to women because of domestic violence greatly surpasses injury done by any other violent crime or car accidents combined (Schwartz & Scott, 2003). Verbal abuse and psychological abuse is the most detrimental type of abuse for a woman to endure. The effects of verbal abuse tend to be long lasting, even after the abusive relationship is over. The reason is because verbal abuse leads to psychological abuse. Verbal abuse is demeaning and degrading language that abusers use towards their partners on a consistent basis, which inevitably robs the woman of self-esteem and confidence. When an abuser engages in repetitive criticisms’ of a spouse’s ability, put-down’s, name calling, and even threats, this is labeled as psychological abuse. Being ignored, laughed at, or even provoked are other contemptuous acts committed by abusers who are usually narcissistic individuals. Psychological abuse inevitably leads a woman down a path of anxiety and depression. The abused woman will then develop a negative self-perception of herself; affecting her future relationships down the line. Abused women often enough, become vulnerable and susceptible for re-abuse from other men and from people in general. Constant humiliation eventually destroys a woman's belief in her and ultimately she will question her self-worth, believing that the abuse was her fault.

Males are the leading contributors to all forms of sexual abuse (Schwartz & Scott, 2003). Sexual abuse is when a spouse, whom is usually the man, forces the woman to have sex or to commit a sexual act without her consent. Also sexual abuse is when a man commits an indecent sexual assault against his partner’s will or when he forces her to watch pornography. Social abuse is when a spouse isolates his partner from visiting or speaking with family members or friends. The woman is usually talked out of, or convinced not to communicate with loved ones by the use of threats or manipulation from her partner. Socially isolating a woman from family is just the abusers’ way to gain more power and control over his woman or what he sees as his “property”. Some abusers even go as far as moving to another state in order to prevent his partner from interacting with her loved ones. Economic abuse occurs when the man has total control over all financial resources. Economical abuse is when a spouse does not allow his partner to have access or control over her own money or money in general, and denies her the...
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