Does Divorce Harm Children

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Lakin Trahan
Week 6 Position Paper
Does Divorce Of Parents Harm Their Children????
The Honeymoon is over and things are not what you had hoped. Years after trying to make it work, you and your spouse realize you are just better apart. Going your separate ways would be the easy way out, but there are children involved. Is this going to help you and hurt them? In this paper I am going to explore the many different aspects and opinions of this question. No: Robert Emery, PhD, who wrote, The Truth about Children and Divorce, says the truth is somewhere in the middle. He goes on to say that, in cases where the parents do argue often, divorce can actually be a relief to the children because they no longer have to live with all the tension they had experienced. Yes: 1.Judith S. Wallerstein, from “Growing up in the divorced family” Clinical Social Work Journal (Winter 2005). Clinical psychologist Judith Wallerstein argues not only that children are harmed when their parents’ divorce but also that these negative side effects continue into their adult lives. Wallerstein claims that adolescents of divorce families often become involved with drugs, alcohol, and sexual activity earlier than adolescents of intact families. And once they are adults, she claims that these children suffer from acute anxiety when attempting to love and form permanent relationships. My position on the subject is that divorce is harmful to children. I feel that the outcome of the effects may vary depending on the different situations. But overall, whether it is in the long run or immediately afterward, divorce will have some negative effect on that child or children. I feel this way because I grew up in a two parent home and think that I am a better person compared to what I would have been if my father and mother had raised me separately. Were they always happy, no, but they did provide an example to me that marriage will not always be, but dedication and sacrifice are key. My husband is a child of divorced parents. His father left the home at the age of 3, both his parents are since remarried, but he still feels it had a negative effect on him, even though he has a close relationship with both parents. He feels though he lacked stability. While divorce is typically not encouraged or applauded in the marriages of most cultures, subtle and blatant differences in the acceptability of divorce vary from culture to culture. While some cultures honor and respect the individuality and independence of those bound in a marital union, others more strongly promote maintaining the structure of the family unit. In the Hispanic culture, children are taught at a young age to value family and likewise marriage above all else, even their own individual well-being. Since the value of family is placed over the value of self, divorce is not as acceptable as it is in other cultures and can lead to becoming an outcast or in the least, being looked upon with disapproval or scorn. Disrupting the family unit is generally not widely accepted. African American households are less likely to enter the bond of marriage than that of Caucasian or Hispanic households, and likewise, divorce is generally much more acceptable within this culture. According to BGSU.edu, African American households have lower expectations for marital life and, likewise, higher and more socially acceptable divorce rates. Economic instability is seen as a strong catalyst for prompting divorce in African American households. The cultural independence of women in African American culture can also lead to higher divorce numbers, as the women in the relationships don't view themselves as reliant on the man. Caucasian couples are similar to the marital values of Hispanic households. A high value of marriage and the family unit is fostered in Caucasian children of a young age. Traditional values also dictate that the woman is reliant on the man, in contrast to the African American culture, making it more socially...
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