Discussing the Teaching and Learning Strategies

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Teaching and learning strategies used in an actual session and to be delivered during professional practice. The strategies to be used will depend on several different components, e.g. the ability, knowledge and background of learners, the subject, differing learning styles etc. John Dewey (1859-1952) believed that formal schooling was falling short of its potential. He emphasised facilitating learning through promoting various activities rather than by using a traditional teacher-focused method. He believed that children learnt more from guided experience than from authoritarian instruction. He subscribed to learner-focused philosophy and argued that learning is life, not just preparation for life. This is also applicable to adult learners. Using different teaching methods, combined with learner activities, will help reach the different learning styles of the individuals we are teaching. Fleming (1987) categorised learning styles as visual (seeing), aural (hearing) and kinaesthetic (doing). Gravells. A, Simpson. S, (2010) Second Edition, Planning and Enabling Learning in the Lifelong Learning Sector. Exeter: Learning Matters We have clearly come a long way from the ‘traditional’ teaching and learning beliefs that were practiced before John Dewey pioneered learner-focused teaching. Learning in the classroom and in the workshops/salon floor will be enhanced when using appropriate learning techniques and taking your learners preferred learning styles into consideration is a vital factor in this. According to data collected from a questionnaire submitted to students aged 11 to 18 years and provided by M. Hebditch, Gillingham School Dorset,1990: Students like action, talking in groups, making things, being involved. The more traditional ways of learning, i.e. Essays, Lectures, Time schedules etc., were definitely less popular. Petty G,(2009) Fourth Edition Teaching Today. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes, p140 This is most likely true when thinking back on our own learning experiences but more recently, when reflecting on the first peer teaching sessions, it could be seen that by including the audience of students/peers with an active task you will ensure their attention and inclusion more easily than just by delivering a lectured lesson. For my own ‘Peer Teach’ I chose the topic of ‘Contraindications’. On reflection I possibly did not include all my peers as much as I wanted to and was also guilty of presuming my peers would have some sort of prior knowledge of the subject. Also I crammed too much information into a short time span. This meant that I wasn’t able to interact sufficiently and encourage my peers to have group discussion and questions on the subject. Comparing and contrasting my session with some of my peers sessions, I could see that in most of the sessions where students had to do things or be involved in some way then a greater degree of learning was witnessed. (Please see previous Section 2 of assignment, Peer teach session plan, rational and feedback) The teachers enthusiasm is of great contribution and forms an important part of a successful lesson but your enthusiasm and interest does not always go hand in hand with that of your students, students do not necessarily find the same things exciting as you do. It is of greater importance that we find out and know what students like and what makes them tick. I am privileged to gain my teaching experience in a very well established, specialised hairdressing training centre, Herbert of Liverpool training centre (HOL). It is in the interest of the centre to provide all students with the necessary tools to achieve their ambitions and goals in life. Helping them to prepare for future employment and life. HOL is working closely with VCTC,...
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