Discrimination and Same-Sex Marriages

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Discrimination and Same-Sex Marriages
Scott D. Kuhn
English 1020
Professor Appelt
July 17, 2011

Abstract
My subject is on discrimination and same-sex marriage. During my research, I looked at what discrimination was and where it came from. Next, I focused my attention towards the Bible and the views of Christianity. Lastly, I took a look at what the law had to say about same-sex marriage. What I found was astonishing. My conclusion was that discrimination is ever prevalent in today's society, and that if you do not allow same-sex marriage, then you are discriminating against others.

Discrimination and Same-Sex Marriages
What if someone came into your home today and told you that you could no longer have children. Why you ask? Well because your annual income was less than $50,000 a year. Would you feel discriminated against? Would you feel that your rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness had been stripped away? Would you stand up and fight for those rights? How would it make you feel? Same-sex couples are discriminated against like this every day of their lives.

Growing up, I was taught to treat everyone the same. It didn't matter what their race, gender, or their religious affiliation was. I have tried to teach my child the same philosophy. Teaching her has not always been easy. Every time she turns on the television, or goes on the internet, she is bombarded with discrimination. Several weeks ago, she finally asked me "Dad, why are people still discriminating against gay and lesbian couples who want to get married?" I looked at those innocent eyes and told her, "I don't know sweetheart, but I will find out."

It has been several weeks since my daughter and I had our conversation. I have spent long hours looking for clues to help me find the answer to her question. My research has led me to believe that there is not just one easy answer. Your political view, or your religious view, determines whether or not you feel it is discrimination. Based on my data, the conclusion I came to was somewhat of a surprise. Discrimination was alive and well in the good old United States of America (USA).

But how could that be? With the number of civil rights organizations that are active in today's society, you would think that discrimination would have been stamped out by now. Well, I am here to tell you that it has not, and that if you don't allow same-sex marriage, then you are still discriminating against others. To prove this, I needed to find out more about discrimination. Not just the definition, but what it meant to our history as a nation.

The first place I looked at was Webster's online dictionary. Webster's defines discrimination as "unfair treatment of a person or group on the basis of prejudice" (Cassidy, 1998). Furthermore, it defines prejudice as "a partiality that prevents objective consideration of an issue or situation" (Cassidy, 1998).

Discrimination is rooted in our beliefs and values that we are taught as we move through our lives. I can remember when my daughter was first attending grade school. I was amazed at how well all of the children got along. It didn't matter the race or gender. Children are not born with any prejudice. They learn those things later in life. Who do they learn it from? Us. Yes, we teach them how to discriminate. Like I said before, discrimination is rooted in our beliefs and values.

Believe it or not, this country was founded on discrimination. The following is from the Declaration of Independence. Pay close attention to the underlined phrase:
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

All throughout our history, discrimination has been ever prevalent. The civil war ended in April of 1865. Later that same year, slavery was abolished. In...
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