Developing a Marketing Plan for Lemonhead

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Developing a marketing plan for Lemonhead

Chami Coomasaru Marketing Department, Carlsberg-Tetley James Day, Spencer Lee Sales Department, Carlsberg-Tetley Presents a marketing plan based on primary research, which focuses on the proposed launch of a new product, Lemonhead, into the existing alcoholic lemon drink market. For this analysis, Two Dogs (the current number two in the sector) was selected as the main competitor product. Using the mix map model, identifies by empirical research short-falls regarding the four Ps, which then became the focus for attack in the promotion of Lemonhead. Shows the short-term strategy of replacing the current number two to be successful in achieving the long-term goal of becoming the market leader.

Introduction
This case study is in the form of a plan which focuses on the proposed launch of a new product, Lemonhead, into the existing alcoholic lemon drink market. For the purpose of analysis, Two Dogs (the current No. 2 in the sector) was selected as a direct comparison and a benchmark for improvement. Currently, the entire alcoholic lemon drink or “alcopop” sector is valued at £60 million and growing by 20 per cent. (Market research statistics, August/September 1995). Our target market is predominantly “funloving” 18-24 year olds. The two major objectives of the case are to attack Two Dogs and become No. 2 in the market within six months and, once established, we want to then be challenging for the market leader position within 12 months. To reinforce the need of a new product launch, we approached our target market and asked them what they wanted through a questionnaire survey Our findings showed us that . there was a genuine need for Lemonhead and indicated what variables had to be incorporated into the elements of the marketing mix: • Product – high taste/high image. • Price – high premium/high value. • Promotion – high media/high merchandising. • Place – high pub and clubs/high retail. It is apparent, from our analysis, that Two Dogs is currently inconsistent within its marketing strategy Using the mix map model . and our empirical research we identified the weaknesses of Two Dogs as being low on taste, image, value, merchandising and media promotion. We will ultimately satisfy all needs of the customer by launching a product with high taste and high image. We plan to build the brand image by advertising in cinemas, on commercial radio and in specific magazine publications. The image will be further enhanced by sampling sessions in on-trade and public locations, dual sponsorship at top nightclubs and with Club 18-30, and moneyoff vouchers incorporated in student welcome packs; coupled with “wacky” packaging and the strap line “Gives good lemon”.

Our “consistent” marketing strategy will enable us to satisfy both our core objectives and, more importantly, the requirements of our target market. The launch of Lemonhead will, in effect, turn Two Dogs into a dead dog.

Report
For the purpose of this case study we are proposing to launch a product called Lemonhead which is an alcoholic lemon drink. The rationale for this case study has come about due to initial secondary research which shows that the alcoholic soft drink market, or the hard soft drink market (products of which are known as “alcopops”) is a high growth sector. We have chosen to concentrate our efforts on attacking Two Dogs with a competitive marketing strategy . According to the most recent market research data (November/December 1995), for the total UK off-trade, the total sales in litres for the total lemonade market was 2.9 million. Of this, Hooch enjoys 2.1 million litres and Two Dogs has only 0.5 million litres. This quite clearly establishes Hooch as the market leader. From our secondary market research we have found that there are 47 different varieties of alcoholic soft drinks, coupled with the fact that the sterling distribution for the alcoholic lemonade market grew from 3 per cent in June/July 1995 to 20...
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