Deliver and Monitor a Service to Customers

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Introduction
Welcome to the unit Deliver and monitor a service to customers (BSBCUS301A). Work through the information to learn about:
* keeping an eye on customer needs
* delivering service to customers
* monitoring the quality of service that employees deliver to customers * reviewing customers' satisfaction and suggesting ways to improve the quality of service. Knowing your customers
Customers can be described as external and internal customers. Your organisation may have corporate customers and individual members of the public – external customers. In a courier business, external customers are the people who request the delivery of their goods and the people who are receiving the delivered goods. Internal customers may be others in the organisation. For example, reception, sales, drivers, supervisors. It is your responsibility to use appropriate interpersonal skills to identify and clarify what all your customers need and to follow your organisation's requirements when dealing with customers. For example, what is your organisation's expectation in regards to payment and delivery options, OHS, anti–discrimination? Meet customer needs

To ensure you can deliver great service to your customers you need to: * determine the urgency of the customer's needs so you can prioritise the service you offer * use effective communication

* identify any limitations to meeting a customer's needs and seek help from the nominated people * set priorities based on the customer's need for urgency. Click on each tab on the right to read about good practice for delivering customer service. When you have finished, click Next to continue.

Determine urgency
To ensure you can best meet the needs of your customers you need to work out how urgent their needs are. When you have assessed how urgent the request is you can prioritise the services you are providing. Most organisations have their own policies and procedures for dealing with urgent requests. Organisational policies and procedures might include: * payment and delivery options

* replacement and refund policies
* pricing and discount procedures.
For example, where a customer might be annoyed because they want to return something that you don't think is appropriate, you can refer to your organisation's refund policy to support your reasons. As well as considering your organisation's policies and procedures when assessing urgency, you also need to allow for any relevant legislation from all levels of government. These might be: * anti-discrimination legislation

* ethical principles
* codes of practice
* privacy laws
* occupational health & safety (OHS)
* financial legislation.
Effective communication
Whether you work in a call centre, an accountant's firm or a Centrelink office you should be able to explain to all your customers how your organisation can meet their needs. You can do this with effective communication. Taking the time to inform customers about what you can and can't do for them makes for great customer service. It: * shows your interest in their needs

* strengthens and builds relationships
* demonstrates you are trying to understand and appreciate the needs and pressures on your customers. In addition to questioning and active listening skills, you need the following communication skills to inform and assist customers with their options: * giving customers full attention, for example, immediately ending a conversation with a work mate when a customer makes an enquiry * maintaining eye contact, except where eye contact may be culturally inappropriate, for example, to make direct eye-contact with Maoris, especially the male during a conversation may be considered inappropriate * speaking clearly and concisely, especially if you are communicating with a customer via telephone * using active listening techniques, for example, summarising or restating the customer's request * using...
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