Cyber Crime and Security

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  • Topic: Computer crime, Malware, Fraud
  • Pages : 22 (7738 words )
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  • Published : April 14, 2013
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CYBER CRIME AND SECURITY

B.JAYANTH
ROLL NO:108W1A0507
COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

ABSTRACT:
Computer crime refers to any crime that involves a computer and a network. The computer may have been used in the commission of a crime, or it may be the target. Netcrime refers to criminal exploitation of the Internet. Cybercrimes are defined as: "Offences that are committed against individuals or groups of individuals with a criminal motive to intentionally harm the reputation of the victim or cause physical or mental harm to the victim directly or indirectly, using modern telecommunication networks such as Internet (Chat rooms, emails, notice boards and groups) and mobile phones (SMS/MMS)". Such crimes may threaten a nation’s security and financial health.  Issues surrounding this type of crime have become high-profile, particularly those surrounding cracking, copyright infringement, child pornography, and child grooming. There are also problems of privacy when confidential information is lost or intercepted, lawfully or otherwise.  Activity crossing international borders and involving the interests of at least one nation state is sometimes referred to as cyber warfare. Computer security is information security as applied to computers and networks. The field covers all the processes and mechanisms by which computer-based equipment, information and services are protected from unintended or unauthorized access, change or destruction. Computer security also includes protection from unplanned events and natural disasters. In this paper I am going to explain about the current cyber crime issues. Keywords:

Spam,fraud,offensive content,harassment,threats,cyber terrorism.cyber warfare.

INTRODUCTION
In less than two decades, the Internet has grown from a curiosity to an essential element of modern life for millions. As with other aspects of globalization, its rapid expansion has far exceeded regulatory capacity, and this absence of authority has left space for many abuses. The problem is compounded by the fact that the Internet was fashioned on a military system designed to circumvent interference and external controls. But even those who most loudly champion its creative anarchy have come to realize that the Internet can only reach its full potential if some basic ground rules are established and if antisocial behaviour is vigorously discouraged. The challenge remains how, exactly, to do this.

“Cybercrime” has been used to describe a wide range of offences, including offences against computer data and systems (such as “hacking”), computer-related forgery and fraud (such as “phishing”), content offences (such as disseminating child pornography), and copyright offences (such as the dissemination of pirated content).It has evolved from the mischievous one-upmanship of cyber-vandals to a range of profit-making criminal enterprises in a remarkably short time. Of course, criminals, like everyone else with access, make use of the Internet for communication and information gathering, and this has facilitated a number of traditional organized crime activities. But the growing importance of the Internet and our collective dependence on it has also created a number of new criminal opportunities.

Cybercrime is a term for any illegal activity that uses a computer as its primary means of commission. The U.S. Department of Justice expands the definition of cybercrime to include any illegal activity that uses a computer for the storage of evidence. The growing list of cybercrimes includes crimes that have been made possible by computers, such as network intrusions and the dissemination of computer viruses, as well as computer-based variations of existing crimes, such as identity theft, stalking, bullyingand terrorism. There are a number of controversial issues surrounding cybercrime. Opinions differ, for...
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