Consumer Behaviour Audit

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CONSUMER BEHAVIOR AUDIT
The Consumer Behavior Audit is divided into the following sections: MARKET SEGMENTATION
A. External Influences
B. Internal Influences
C. Situational Influences
D. Decision-Process Influences
PRODUCT POSITION
A. Internal Influences
B. Decision-Process Influences
PRICING
A. External Influences
B. Internal Influences
C. Situational Influences
D. Decision-Process Factors
DISTRIBUTION STRATEGY
A. External Influences
B. Internal Influences
C. Situational Influences
D. Decision-Process Factors
PROMOTIONAL STRATEGY
A. External Factors
B. Internal Factors
C. Situational Influences
D. Decision-Process Influences
PRODUCT
A. External Influences
B. Internal Influences
C. Situational Influences
D. Decision-Process Influences
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION AND COMMITMENT
MARKET SEGMENTATION
As mentioned by Silvia Rico, the market segment consists of single women with children, ages 25-44, who live in the same geographical area in Brownsville and shop at Lopez Supermarket. A. External influences

Are there cultures or subcultures whose value system is particularly consistent (or inconsistent) with the consumption of our product? The value system for the subculture (Mexican-Americans) is for the most part consistent with the consumption of Lopez Supermarket since they all share the traditions and beliefs, Hispanic race, Spanish language, and nationality background. Average family size for this segment is of 3.5, and spends 15 to 20 percent more of disposable income on groceries than the national average. They view their family and friends as an important part of their life, and value their opinions when making decisions such as where to shop for groceries. Customers of Lopez are generally those living close to the store. In general they are low-income Mexican/Hispanics with limited resources, strong values, high ties to family and tradition and the majority practice the Catholic religion. Is our product appropriate for male or female consumption? Will ongoing gender-role changes affect who consumes our product or how it is consumed? Lopez Supermarket is appropriate for both male and female consumption. Even though, according to the Census Bureau, 17.4% of households are made up of female householder, and 45.8% without husband presence and with children, products sold at Lopez can be bought by either male or female. The ongoing gender-role (assuming that is from the same culture and subculture) would not change as to who buys at Lopez, but it could affect how it is consumed. Meaning, men, just as women, shop at Lopez, but men would not shop as much or buy the same products as women. Do ethnic, social, regional, or religious subcultures have different consumption patterns relevant to our product? Ethnic and social subculture, for the most part, might have a different consumption patterns. Some might like to go to Lopez to make use of their rebate coupons they offer. Some might shop on a daily basis, while others might shop once a week. It all depends on the amount of income and time they have to make their shopping. For the most part, Lopez is directed to a Mexican-American region culture. If Lopez were to locate somewhere where Mexican-American population is very low, Lopez’ current environment might not be as appreciated due a difference in values and believes other segments might have. Do various demographic or social-strata groups (age, gender, urban/suburban/rural, occupation, income, education) differ in their consumption of our product? Mexican-American is one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in the U.S. (in Brownsville, they totaled 103.297). Geography is an advantage for Lopez, since stores are located on the border of U.S. and Mexico. Demographic and social-strata groups (age, gender, urban/suburban/rural, occupation, income, education) might have different motive...
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