Consumer Behavior and Marketing Strategy for Mcommerce

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A
Comprehensive Project

On

Effects of Mobile on Consumer Buying Behavior and Marketing Strategies

In partial fulfillment of the requirement of two years full time Masters of Business Administration (MBA) Programme (2011-2013) Of Kalol Institute of Management, Kalol

UNDER GUIDANCE OF: PREPARED BY: Ms.______________________ Darshak Modi (KIM-150)
Professor Keyur Valand(KIM-)

Table of Contents
History3
Products and services available5
Mobile Money Transfer5
Mobile ATM5
Mobile ticketing6
Mobile vouchers, coupons and loyalty cards6
Content purchase and delivery6
Location-based services6
Information services7
Mobile banking7
Mobile StoreFront7
Mobile brokerage7
Auctions7
Mobile Browsing8
Mobile Purchase8
Mobile marketing and advertising8
Influence on youth markets9

History
The Global Mobile Commerce Forum, which came to include over 100 organizations, had its fully minuted launch in London on 10 November 1997 . It was founded by Logica and Cellnet . The meeting was opened by Dr Mike Short, former chairman of the GSM Association , with forecasts from Kevin Duffey (Group Telecoms Director of Logica)  and Tom Alexander (later CEO of Virgin Mobile and then of Orange) . Kevin Duffey was elected elected  as the Executive Chairman at the first meeting in November 1997. Over 100 companies joined the Forum within a year, many forming mobile commerce teams of their own, e.g. Mastercard and Motorola . Mobile commerce was born in 1997 when the first two mobile-phone enabled Coca Cola vending machines were installed in the Helsinki area in Finland. The machines accepted payment via SMStext messages. The first mobile phone-based banking service was launched in 1997 by Merita Bank of Finland, also using SMS. In 1998, the first sales of digital content as downloads to mobile phones were made possible when the first commercial downloadable ringtones were launched in Finland by Radiolinja (now part ofElisa Oyj). Two major national commercial platforms for mobile commerce were launched in 1999: Smart Money (http://smart.com.ph/money/ ) in the Philippines, and NTT DoCoMo's i-Mode Internet service in Japan. i-Mode offered a revolutionary revenue-sharing plan where NTT DoCoMo kept 9 percent of the fee users paid for content, and returned 91 percent to the content owner. Mobile-commerce-related services spread rapidly in early 2000. Norway launched mobile parking payments. Austria offered train ticketing via mobile device. Japan offered mobile purchases of airline tickets. In April 2002, building on the work of the Global Mobile Commerce Forum (GMCF), the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) appointed Joachim Hoffmann of Motorola to develop official standards  for mobile commerce. In appointing Mr Hoffman, ETSI quoted industry analysts as predicting "that m-commerce is poised for such an exponential growth over the next few years that could reach US$200 billion by 2004 ". The first book to cover mobile commerce was Tomi Ahonen's M-profits in 2002. The first university short course to discuss mobile commerce was held at the University of Oxford in 2003, with Tomi Ahonen and Steve Jones lecturing. As of 2008, UCL Computer Science andPeter J. Bentley demonstrated the potential for medical applications on mobile devices.[2] PDAs and cellular phones have become so popular that many businesses[specify] are beginning to use mobile commerce as a more efficient way to communicate with their customers. In order to exploit the potential mobile commerce market, mobile phone manufacturers such as Nokia, Ericsson, Motorola, and Qualcomm are working with carriers such as AT&T Wireless and Sprint to develop WAP-enabled smartphones. Smartphones offer fax, e-mail, and phone capabilities. "Profitability for device vendors...
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