Cognitive Competence

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Tomorrow’s Leader
Term paper
Topic: Cognitive Competence

Wai (Synergy)

Content
Part 1
1. Definition cognitive competenceP.3-4
2. Theory of cognitive competenceP.5-8
3. Factors affecting cognitive competenceP.9-10
4. Importance of cognitive competence in leadershipP.11-12 5. Ways to enhance the level of cognitive competenceP.13-14

Part 2
Self evaluationP.15-17

Part 3
ReferenceP.18-19

Part 1
Definition of cognitive competence

1. Cognitive competence is defined as the ability to perform adequately those cognitively complex tasks considered essential for living on one's own in this society. (Willis SL.(1996). Everyday cognitive competence in elderly persons: conceptual issues and empirical findings, Oct;36(5):595-601)

2. The ability to develop and apply the cognitive skills of self-talk, the reading and interpretation of social cues, using steps for problem-solving and decision making, understanding the perspective of others, understanding behavioral norms, a positive attitude towards life, and self –awareness. (The W.T. Grant Consortium on the School-Based Promotion of Social Competence (1992: 136))

3. Academic and intellectual achievement. (include the ability to use logic, analytic thinking, and abstract reasoning) (Catalano, R. F., Berglund, M. L., Ryan, J. A. M., Lonczak, H. S., & Hawkins, J. D. (2002). Positive youth development in the United States: Research findings on evaluations of positive youth development programs. Prevention and Treatment, 5 (15), 1-106.)

This three definitions are little bit different. The third one is too narrow as it just mentioned academic and intellectual achievement. The second one, on the other hand, is not specific enough. In my understanding, I think cognitive competence is best defined using the first two definitions. “Cognitive competence is defined as the ability to perform adequately those cognitively complex tasks considered essential for living on one's own in this society. It also includes understanding the perspective of others, understanding behavioral norms, and self –awareness.”

Theory

Hui & Sun’s model (2007)
This model divides cognitive competence into three types of thinking: 1. Creative thinking, a way of looking at problems or situations from a fresh perspective that suggests unorthodox solutions (which may look unsettling at first). 2. Critical thinking, which includes reasoning, making references, self-reflection, and coordination of multiple views. Critical thinking has been described as "the process of purposeful, self-regulatory judgment, which uses reasoned consideration to evidence, context, conceptualizations, methods, and criteria." (Facione, Peter A. Critical Thinking: What It is and Why It Counts, Insightassessment.com) 3. Rational thinking refers to logical or reasoning being involved in the thought process. It refers to providing reasons or rational behind thoughts or ideas. It adds an element of calculation and planning to a steam of thoughts rather than basing them on emotion or personal opinion. It is a kind of objective process of thinking and an analytic approach to any problem. Rational thinking is based on reasons or facts and is hence much more calculating and realistic. Geiwitz’s model

This model divides cognitive competence into three steps of thinking: 1. Know what, to know what is the problem
2. Know how, to know how the problem can be solved
3. Know why, to know why choose particular method to solve the problem, or to evaluate the method currently used. What
How
Why

In Hui and Sun’s model, creative thinking is the innovative way of thinking. It allows people to invent new things or idea. Critical thinking is used when commenting on something, e.g. in writing editorials. As for rational thinking, it is used when analyzing. In my opinion, the second model is easier to understand. And it shows...
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