Civil Servants

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By Federal law, no government employee unions can act as an entity for grievances, disputes, and other employee related matters. However, they cannot encourage or authorize a strike, nor can employees go on strike. The risk is termination. For military members, there is a grievance system, but it remains within the chain-of-command, or in severe cases, the Judge Advocate General.

Case Study: The last union to test the law was the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization on August 3, 1981. PATCO, then certified as a government union, violated the law {5 U.S.C. (Supp. III 1956) when it led its members on a nationwide strike. President Reagan, invoking elements of the Taft-Hartley Act, ordered the members back to work within 48 hours or be terminated. Only1,300 of 13,000 actually returned, believing that Reagan wouldn't terminate them. They were wrong. On August 5, 1981, Reagan fired the remaining striking workers and banned them from Federal service for life (this was rescinded by Clinton during his term).

Employers have the Responsibility of stopping Essential Services from Striking by providing better remunerations & work benefits when need arise like inflation problems facing the labour market.

Workers in essential services already give up so much of their personal well-being for their jobs (e.g., firefighters who work overnight shifts, or garbage men who work on holidays). If they have legitimate complaints about their working conditions, they should be permitted to go on strike if they have tried every other reasonable method of resolving the dispute. Sometimes it takes desperate measures to achieve results.
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