Case Study Writing Fromate

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Writing a case study report
Josephine Hook, Research & Learning Coordinator Josephine.Hook@monash.edu

(Source: www.office.microsoft.com)

Outline
 What is a case study?
 Approaching a case study assignment  The structure of a case study report  Key elements of a case study report

What is a case?
A case might be:  A real / realistic situation  A specific business problem

A case is a scenario that gives you the opportunity to identify problems and recommend a course of action in a business situation. The case may be real or fictional, but will usually represent a complex situation with no ready solutions.

(http://www.asb.unsw.edu.au/learningandteaching/Documents/writingacaseanalysis.pdf)

What is a case study?
Case studies:
 approximate real-world situations, thus they add a dimension of reality to your studies.  address problems, challenges or issues that need to be investigated and solved.  are used to assess how well you have understood the relevant theories and concepts, by your ability to apply these to solve the problems detailed in the case study.

(http://www.csu.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/82743/casestudy.pdf)

Different types of case study
The 'analytical approach’ – A case is examined to try to understand what has happened and why. – This approach does not identify problems or attempt to develop solutions. The ‘problem-oriented approach’

– A case is analysed to identify: • the major problems that exist, • the causes of and possible solutions to the problems, • a recommendation as to the best solution to implement. (http://www.monash.edu.au/lls/llonline/quickrefs/27-case-study.xml)

Writing a case study
When writing a case study, you will apply theoretical concepts to realistic, practical situations. In writing a case study, you demonstrate your:

 understanding of concepts,
 analytical skills, and  problem solving abilities

In a case study, it is crucial that you integrate relevant theory from your unit of study with evidence from the case.

(Kimberley & Crosling, 2012, p.60)

Why write a case study?
Case studies provide you with an active learning experience with opportunities including:  deepening your understanding of theories through viewing them in relation to practical situations;

 developing a greater appreciation of the complexity of problems that can arise in practice;  analysis and evaluation;  expressing ideas concisely and with clarity;

 creating convincing, reasoned arguments;
 proposing solutions to genuine problems.
(http://www.csu.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/82743/casestudy.pdf)

Approaching a case study task
The first thing you need to be clear about is what kind of task you have been set. Are you being asked to:  observe a case and explain what happened?  analyse the case by reference to theories on the topic?  identify major problems and offer solutions?  all of these?

(http://www.griffith.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/320177/writing-a-case-study.pdf)

Approaching a case study
Consider:  background to the case – the individual or the organisation you are studying and what has happened that is of interest or concern.  your observations: not only what is going on but why, how, when and who is affected?  what the experts have to say about this topic. Do your observations align with theories on this topic or not? Explore the similarities and differences.  what are your conclusions?  do you have recommendations? What are the reasons for your recommendations?

(http://www.griffith.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/320177/writing-a-case-study.pdf)

The process of completing the task
In analysing a case, your task is to • identify the problem(s) in the situation presented in the scenario

• analyse the key issues within the context of the theory presented in your course • develop and compare alternative solutions to the problems • consider the advantages and disadvantages of various...
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