Case Study of Whirlpool

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Question No. 1
Structured Problems.
A problem which can be broken down into a series of well-defined steps.

Un-structured Problems.

A problem that requires the use of intuition, reasoning, and memory.

A product design is balance of Art and Science. The first thing in any new product design is to explore basic form (what it looks like). This is not a scientifically structured phase, rather it relies on one's having a "good eye" for aesthetic. Once that's finished, then the structured phase begins: defining geometry, understanding the interfaces, applying appropriate materials, etc. Ultimately product development is a back and forth iteration with both structured and unstructured phases. However, in case of Chuck’s realization this problem looks like an un-structured problem because Chuck had never gone through this kind of experience. He has no past no past record for the impact of design change on pay-off. He has the fears and threats regarding new design.

Question No. 2


Chuck’s first step was to surveys other “Design centric” Companies like Nike, BMW, Nokia. Focus on Customers preferences.
Do not focus on Bottem-line returns.
Puts Design prototypes in front of customer focus groups.
Get detailed measurements of their preferences about Aesthetics, Craftsmanship, technical performance, ergonomics and usability. Chart the results against competing products and the company’s own product. This approach gives the Decision makers a base-line of objective evidence from which to make investment decisions.


Design investment decisions are now based on facts not opinion. The new decision making approach has transformed the company’s culture and led to bolder designs because the designers can now make a strong case for making those investments. By following this approach the company can do innovation in their products.

Question No. 3


Chuck Jones was appointed as Chief designer. Whirlpool is an...
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