Cape Caribbean Studies Sba Guide

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CONTENTS
The SBA has seven chapters as follows: Chap. 1 – Introduction Chap. 2 – Literature Review Chap. 3 – Data Collection sources Chap. 4 – Presentation of findings Chap. 5 – Interpretation of findings Chap. 6 – Discussion of findings Chap. 7 – Conclusions, Limitations, Recommendations

Choosing a topic


Choose a theme from the list in the syllabus – ensure that you are familiar with the theme. Choose a theme that interests you, something that you would be interested in studying. Choose a sub theme from your theme and develop a problem statement. DO NOT develop a problem statement that is too broad. Study a village rather than a country.







Here is an example: THEME CRIME SUB THEME EFFECTS OF CRIME PROBLEM STATEMENT “A survey of the effects of crime on the residents of Mala village, St. Vincent.”

YOU CAN ALSO DEVELOP A HYPOTHESIS A hypothesis is a statement which suggests the possible answer to your problem statement FOR EXAMPLE: Problem Statement - “A survey of the effects of crime on the residents of Mala village, St. Vincent.” Hypothesis – “Crime has negative effects on the residents of Mala village, St. Vincent.”

DEVELOP RESEARCH QUESTIONS You should develop research questions to guide your research. These help to give focus to your project. EXAMPLE “A survey of the effects of crime on the residents of Mala village, St. Vincent.” Research Questions 1. What kinds of crime are committed in Mala Village? 2. Who Commits crime in Mala village? 3. What effects do these crimes have on residents? 4. Who are mostly affected by the crimes committed? 5. What are some solutions to the crime problem in Mala village?

The introduction has four main parts:
   

Chapter 1 – Introduction

Relevance of topic Problem statement Educational value Definition of technical terms You can choose to write the introduction in paragraphs, with each paragraph highlighting each of the parts above or you can use headings to separate each part.

INTRODUCTION OUTLINE FOR “A survey of the effects of crime on the residents of Mala village, St. Vincent.” 1.

Relevance of topic write about one or two paragraphs. Talk about the relevance of the topic you have chosen to your society or community. How will it benefit? Basically you are saying why you are studying the topic.

2.

The problem Statement Write one paragraph. Include the problem statement, the hypothesis if there is one and the research questions. You should also give a geographical description of the location of your study area and its average population. Educational value Write about one paragraph. Here you are talking about who will benefit from your project, how will they benefit, what can the information be used for. Say how much educational value it has.

3.

4.

Definition of technical terms Simply make a list of key terms found in your topic and study that may need defining, that might be ambiguous or unclear to your reader. This can be completed when the study is completed since terms can show up throughout the study

EXAMPLE “A survey of the effects of crime on the residents of Mala village, St. Vincent.” Crime – an illegal action punished by law

Chapter 2 – Literature Review
At this stage you are looking to find out what other people have said about your topic in books, journals, articles etc. You should use 5 sources when writing your literature review. Use your research questions as a guide as to what to look for when reading. You might not find a book on your village or exact topic but the book might be on the theme you have chosen.

For each article or book you should describe why the research was done, where the research was conducted. Compare your own research with existing research. Relate the information to your own topic/problem statement. Pages 427 – 428 of your text book explains the purpose and gives an example of a literature review.

The literature review is technical and must not be taken...
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