Cancer and Mammograms

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Are Mammograms Effective or In-Effective in Detecting Breast Cancer?
Every year breast cancer affects American women either through one’s own diagnosis or through a sister, wife, mother, grandmother, or friend. The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that women under the age of 40 perform monthly breast self-examinations and receive clinical breast self-examinations yearly. Furthermore, ACS also recommends annual mammograms for all women beginning at the age 40, and continuing them as long as the woman is in good health. However, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends mammograms once every two years for all women from ages 50 to 74, which has caused some controversy over the years. The USPSTF’s recommendations have become very controversial. The USPSTF’s recommendation that mammography screening to detect breast cancer be scaled back has caused consternation among women and doctors and prompted some attempts to connect the results to the debate over health care (New York Times). Through experience and research, this paper will express reasons as to why mammograms are important and moreover why it is important to begin breast cancer education and awareness at an early age.

Personally, I would have to have to agree with the American Cancer Society, because a routine mammogram saved my life. A mammogram is a series of specialized X-rays of the breast used to detect abnormal growths or changes in the breast tissue (WebMD). A mammogram can detect early stages of breast cancer. It’s important for women of all ages to understand the importance of mammograms and to understand the importance of taking care of your body at an early age.

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women today (after lung cancer) and is the most common cancer among women. In 2011, an estimated 230,480 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, according to the new report. About 39,520 women will die from the disease in 2011....
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