Book: Gung Ho

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Gung Ho, by Ken Blanchard and Sheldon Bowles was a wonderful book that discussed many important factors involved in making a company truly successful. It had a good storyline to help to tell the story of Gung Ho. When I first picked up the book to read it I really had no idea what to expect to learn from the book. The points that were made in this book were very simple and common sense principles. I say that these principles are simple, but many companies do not think of these little things when running a large business. They try to go "by the book" and get too caught up in sticking to their rules and regulations. Sometimes you just have to use a little common sense when running a business.

Gung Ho is a great idea to help a business become as successful as possible by looking at the internal workings of the company. The idea of Gung Ho starts with the most basic part of a company, the employees. If your employees are happy and excited about working at your company, then productivity will increase. Everyone will work harder for something they think is worthwhile. Take my classes and myself for example. I will be tempted to work harder and study more in a class that I think is worth my time and a class that I enjoy. Professors at Methodist College could learn a lot from this book. If they would try to make classes more enjoyable, instead of standing up and lecturing and reading straight from the book, then perhaps students would be more interested. Some of my favorite classes are with Mr. Hogge. Not because they are easy classes, because its not, but because he makes class fun with the stories and the way he teaches the material.

One of the three main principles of the book Gung Ho is the principal of "The Spirit of the Squirrel". Two words that are very important in a business are "worthwhile work". People will work harder at something that they think is worthwhile. The last two summers that I was in High School I was a manager in a Bar and Grille at a local golf course. I enjoyed my job and worked closely with my employees to help the Bar and Grille is successful. I attribute this very method of Gung Ho. We all worked very hard at what we did because we had a worthwhile goal. The Grille had gone through some very rough spots and had changed owners many times in the past few years. I wanted the members of the course to enjoy their experience with us and to keep coming back to us. I felt like I was making a worthwhile difference to the members by providing them with good service.

It is amazing what you can do as a team when you all have a shared goal in mind. The owner set the goals for us to go by, but was always willing to listen to ideas from his employees. This allowed everyone to feel as if they were having a hand in making the Grille a better place. The spirit of the squirrel reminds me of the people I worked with and how they all pulled together to help. As Andy Longclaw said in the book, "worthwhile doesn't mean more than important, it just covers more territory than important". All of the Grille workers knew the work they did was important, and that led to a common goal between all of us. We used values to guide all of our work and didn't take shortcuts because we had values. We knew that every little thing was worthwhile and part of a larger plan. In the book, Andy says that everyone should work toward a shared goal and that goals are marker posts you drive into the future landscape between where you are and where you want to be. We all decided to make a goal of making the Grille the best it had been in years and to keep it under one owner for more than two years. Andy also reported about there being two types of goals. One is result goals set out where we want to be. The other is value goals set out the impact we want to make on the lives of team members, customers, and the community.

The second of the principles in Gung Ho is "The Way of the Beaver". In control of...
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