Bend It Like Beckham Notes

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Triumphs over limitations such as cultural differences, sexism, racism and relationships Cultural differences - she wants to both appease her traditional Sikh family and her constant internal struggle as she tries to achieve her goal of becoming a football player. Dialogue is used to show the resistance Jess has to face as she battles against what her family traditions ask of her, like cooking and learning how to become the idea Indian wife, and the opposition that Jess has to overcome in the form of her disapproving parents Jess: "anyone can cook Aloo Gobi, but who can bend a ball like Beckham?" Mrs Bhamra: "What family would want a daughter-in-law who can run around kicking football all day but can't make round chapatis?" quotes show contrast between Jess and her mothers opinion

Jules' parents offer an interesting contrast to Jess' family showing that although cultures may be very different in some ways, they are actually very similar in others. Both Jess and Jules have mothers who disapprove of them participating in what they see as a man's game Paula believes Jules should be more feminine. Paula also thinks that Jules is a lesbian because she plays sport and wears masculine clothes. Paula is homophobic and makes ridiculous comments, like "there's a reason why Sporty Spice is the only one without a fella!" Jules' expectation is to be like all the other girls. We see this when Paula encourages Jules to buy girly bras instead f sports bras and tries to persuade her to become more feminine Jess is supposed to stay covered up and not 'running around half naked in front of men'.
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