Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (Adhd)

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 86
  • Published : March 4, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Psych 106: Paper 2 – Assignment: Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) December, 6, 2011
Robin B. Arslanian - 0196787
Student
Brookdale Community College
Psych 106: Paper 2 – Assignment: Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) December, 6, 2011
Robin B. Arslanian - 0196787
Student
Brookdale Community College

The subject I have chosen for my final paper is a chronic common childhood disorder called Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder commonly referred to as ADHD. I have chosen this particular subject because I as well as 3 of my children have been diagnosed with the disorder. I wanted to learn more about the causes, symptoms, treatments, and what I could do to help my children through what I know is going to be a tough time ahead of them. The first thing that I learned is that there is no such thing as ADD anymore. Now they have only named the disorder ADHD and subdivided the symptoms into subtypes. My goal is to give the reader of this paper a better overall look into this disorder. ADHD is classified as a neurobehavioral disorder. It is the most common childhood disorder. Boys are 3 times more likely to have the disorder than girls. Children with the disorder may exhibit some or all of these symptoms, trouble paying attention, impulsive (may act without thinking about the results), and in some cases, are overly active. It is normal for a child to exhibit these symptoms at times however, if they persist constantly over a period of 6 months or more this may be an indication of the disorder. ADHD has 3 subtypes: Predominately Inattentive Type, Predominately Hyperactive-Impulsive Type, and Combined Type. Determining whether a child or adult has ADHD is a multiple step process. There is not a single test to diagnose this disorder, and many other problems have similar symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and certain types of learning disabilities. A guideline in the DSM-IV-TR is used by mental health professionals to help diagnose ADHD. Using this standard across communities ensures that people are properly diagnosed and treated for ADHD. It will also help determine the prevalence and public health impact across communities. According to the DSM-IV-TR a person must exhibit 6 or more symptoms that are listed under the inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity categories for at least 6 months to an extent that is disruptive and inappropriate for the person’s developmental level. Symptoms that cause impairment are usually present before age 7 (sometimes as early as 4 years old), and are present in 2 or more settings. There must be clear evidence of clinical impairment in social, school, or work functioning. Lastly the symptoms are not better explained by a different mental disorder. Based on this criteria the person may be diagnosed as having 1 of 3 types of ADHD: Combined Type, shows a combination of symptoms from all categories, Predominately Inattentive Type, shows 6 or more symptoms listed in the inattentive category and no symptoms for the other 2 categories, and Hyperactive-Impulsive Type, shows 6 or more symptoms listed from the hyperactive and impulsive categories and no symptoms from the inattention category. Many other disorders can have similar symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and certain types of learning disabilities. This is why it is extremely important to have a full medical exam, after the physician has ruled out any other possibilities he/she might then ask parents, teachers, caregivers and sometimes the child about which symptoms are present and for how long. ADHD is usually diagnosed in early childhood, with 70% of childhood cases lasting into adolescence, and 50% of adolescence will have the condition into adulthood. The causes of ADHD are unknown at this time, but they have discovered through twin studies that genes are linked to and play an important role. Some researchers have found one cause of ADHD to be neurological. They believe that people with ADHD...
tracking img