Art of Nursing

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The Art of Nursing
09/13/2012

Identifying General and Particular Knowledge

1)General knowledge on Mrs. Wilson includes that she is a stroke victim with sustained extensive left-sided weakness, suffers from contractures (shortening of the muscles) in her left arm and leg therefore making her unable to stand or sit straight in her chair. Her speech is halting, slow and hard to understand due to effects of the stroke. 2)Particular knowledge includes that Mrs. Wilson taught school for many years, loved to garden, enjoys her son’s visits, weekly automobile ride, Christianity practitioner (owns a bible), likes to wear socks when she sleeps and etc. 3)The sources of the general knowledge would have to come from the patient’s medical history file. Mrs. Wilson as a stroke victim, one could presume that she might have difficulty with her speaking and with her contractures-the patient not being able to stand or sit straight a chair. The sources for the particular knowledge are obtained from the patient and her close family members or friends. 4)Both aspects of general and particular knowledge are very important to provide a complete care for the patient. 5)Mrs. Wilson will probably need help assisting with her daily activities through out her lifetime due to the effects of the stroke. Particular knowledge is obtained through engaging with the patient and I know that she enjoys spending time with her son, reads bible, likes garden, was a school teacher for many years and overall a nice/caring person (offering a smile and reaching out her unaffected arm to me in greeting). 6)Five questions that I would use to access particular knowledge on a patient: What is your religious belief? What do you do on your leisure time? What is your marital status? Current living situations? How do you deal with stress? Your values in life?
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