American Rap Controversy: Biggie and Tupac

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Censorship paper

e of the main responsibilities of government is to protect its citizen and make their life straightforward and comfortable by screening just about everything in the society. Government have Customs agency so nothing prohibited or destructive can get in the motherland, they have FDA to screen all kind of drugs and food so they can’t injure the general public. Bad foodstuff, expired or questionable drug or illegal items coming through the Border can make our life horrifying but in a long run nothing can influence us more than the media and its several forms such as television, radio, film, documentary, songs or even paper news. After making a film, a documentary or even releasing a song, the first process that the creator/author/director has to pass through is the “censorship”. Censorship is defined as the repression of language or other communication which may be considered objectionable, detrimental, sensitive, or problematic to the society, specific person(s), government or even government agencies as determined by a government, media or other controlling organization(s). In this paper, I am going to talk with reference to two different songs by the N.W.A, known as one of the most dangerous group on earth from Compton, California, Tupac Shakur, representing west coast and Biggie Smalls from east coast of U.S. The organization/band/member of N.W.A and several of its songs have been already banned for its debatable lyrics and political hostility. Some of its songs were so debatable that the government (FBI) had to step in and ban it from the private Web channel for the Public Web users, the “YouTube”.

“1-8-7 on an undercover cop”, by Dr. D.R.E and Snoop Dog, two of the founding members of N.W.A, echoes the resentment towards the Police, a very influential, “dealing with citizens on a daily basis to maintain the law and order situation under control” government branch. The song, in general, speaks of violent behavior and drugs that government is trying to control by assigning its special force D.E.A by sending undercover police to two of the “kingpins” who finds out the true identity and assassinate the undercover “5-0”, a code used by the “urban gangsters” to categorize the police. Back in the late 1980’s and early 90s, thousands of youngsters were blindly going behind all the wordings and the languages that the band members were using as a message to show the authority a huge “Middle Finger”. For such a huge influence on the teenagers which was certainly negative, to keep the law and order situation under control, to avoid idiocy, a good number of U.S peaceful citizen whose main intention was to stay away from conflict found it objectionable. Most of these citizens (mostly white-American) were abiding by laws and had full confidence on the government and its agencies that had only one intention, lock up the criminal, execute crime and drug or gun which cannot damage any more component of the social order. Some of these people were either active or in some way related to government agencies who found several of the metaphors as lyrics used in the song exceedingly insensitive. Now, 99 pigs on a block with me,

Not a motherfuckin' cop wanna knock with me,
A c-o-n-v-i-c-t, the motherfuckin' d-o-g, comin' from the l-b-c.
Look at what the doc brought in,
A chrome 38, a fo'ty-fo' mag, and mack 10
So what you wanna do? (what you wanna do? )
I got the gauge, a uzi and the mothafuckin 22
So if you wanna blast, nigga we can buck 'em
If we stick 'em then we stuck 'em so fuck 'em!"

Yeah, and you don't stop,
Cause it's 1-8-7 on a motherfuckin cop
Yeah, and you don't stop,
Cause it's 1-8-7 on a motherfuckin cop

According to the Californian law, “187”, the code is used to fundamentally assassinate someone. The lyric itself illustrates how...
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