20 Figures of Speech

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20 figures of speech

1. Alliteration
Alice's aunt ate apples and acorns around august.
Eric's eagle eats eggs, enjoying each episode of eating. 2. Anastrophe
"Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country "Arms that wrap about a shawl."
3. Anaphora
Five years have passed;Five summers, with the length ofFive long winters! and again I hear these waters... Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean,Tears from the depth of some divine despair 4. Antithesis

Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice.
You're easy on the eyes, Hard on the heart.
5. Antonomasia
Cambridge is England's Silicon Valley.
He was a horse in the running competition
6. Euphemism
Lover - gentleman friend
Short-sighted - visually challenged
7. Hyperbole
The mountain of paperwork weighed heavily on the teacher's desk. My dog is so ugly, he only has cat friends!
8. Idiom
"Hat trick" - Scoring successively three times in a sport. "A world of their own" - Insular, completely isolated to the reality of others. 9. Irony
Marriage is the leading cause of divorce.
The White House isn't white.
10. Litotes
Heat waves are not rare in the summer.
The weather is not unpleasant at all.
11. Metaphor
He has a heart of gold.
He swam in the sea of diamonds.
12. Oxymoron
Exact opposite
Growing small
13. Onomatopoeia
My teacher told me to shoosh, because I was making too much noise. Grandma loves to hear the pitter-patter of little feet around the house.

14. Metonymy
In Julius Caesar, when Mark Antony, after the death of Caesar, addresses the people 'Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears', he means that he wants the people to listen to what he has to say. Romeo and Juliet, one of William Shakespeare's famous plays has a famous example of metonymy when Esculutus tells about the tragic death of Romeo and Juliet as 'For never was a story of more...
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