Software Design & Development Notes

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9.1 Development and Impact of Software Solutions
9.1.1 Social and ethical issues
Rights and responsibilities of software developers
Rights refer to entitlements that are due to them e.g. how other people use and duplicate their products. Responsibilities is the need for software developers to be accountable of reliability, virus free, etc towards the user •Authorship

oRefers to ownership of a particular piece of work, the author has rights in regard to reproduction and distribution of their work •Reliability
oPurchasers have rights to expect the product to consistently perform the required tasks efficiently and without error. Developers should consider these factors to ensure maximum reliability: Hardware

Operating System
Other software
Runtime errors
Quality
oFinally quality is an important responsibility for developers. A good quality product will meet the program requirements in an efficient way. Quality assurance is a set of procedures used to certify that a generated product meets specified criteria with respect to quality and reliability •Response to Problems

oDevelopers have a responsibility to ensure that any problems users encounters with their products are resolved in a timely, accurate and efficient manner, e.g. the developer refund or inform the customer. •Code of Conduct

oAn official agreement describing ethical and moral obligations of the developer. •Viruses
oSoftware that deliberately produces some undesirable or unwanted result. Developers have a responsibility to ensure their products do not contain viruses.

Software Piracy and Copyright
Software piracy is the criminal act of illegally copying and use of software. •Intellectual property
oIntellectual property is something that belongs to your mind or intellect. Purchasing a software product does not give you the ownership rights but the customer just purchases a licence to use the software. •Plagiarism

oThe process of claiming authorship of an intellectual property. •Shareware
oDistributed free on a trial basis, once tested and decided to use it you must pay for it. Covered by copyright laws •Public Domain
oDoes not carry and copyright restrictions i.e. can be copied, modified •Freeware
oCan be distributed freely, as long as it’s not for profit. •Ownership vs. Licensing
oOwnership implies that you have the rights to do as you with the software. Licence agreements specify the legal framework the program can be used. The customer does not own the software but a license to use the software. The licence agreement is the contract between the end user and developer. •Copyright Laws

oAre in place to safeguard the legal rights of authors of any original works. Copyright gives the exclusive rights to licence others. •Reverse/Backwards Engineering
oAnalysing a product and its parts to understand how it works and to recreate its original design, usually with the purpose of creating a similar product based on this design. •Decompilation
oThe opposite of compilation. Translating machine executable code into low level source code. This allows the programmers design to be more easily understood by a software engineer •License conditions

oOff-the-shelf software packages contains a single user licence, enables the customer to install the software on one computer. Site licences are allowed to be installed on a large number of computers. Multi-user licenses are similar to site licences but they specify the exact numbers of users that can use the software at once. •Network Use

oOrganisations can obtain network licences for use on multiple machines. Concurrent user licence allows the application to be installed on the server and accessed over the network, but at any one time only a certain number of employees can run the program. Domain licences maybe be run on any computer part of a specific domain. •Various national perspectives to software piracy and copyright laws oEstimated use of 40% of all...
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