Organising and Outlining Report

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 41
  • Published : September 30, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
 

REPORT WRITING: ORGANIZING AND OUTLINING 
      LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 
 

Week 4

To appreciate the complex nature of organizing information and content in report  writing  To understand further the critical role of PPQ in report writing 



NTRODUCTION    In the planning stage, you have been introduced to the concept of PPQ –  Problem, Purpose and Questions – as the main driving force of your report  writing. If your PPQ is not formulated well, chances are your report will  not make sense. This is because a well‐articulated PPQ controls the  direction of your work. Your PPQ will tell you if you are moving in the right  direction, or if you are already off‐topic.    The next stage is now to make use of the PPQ to organize the information and data you need.  The point again is: start the report writing process with your PPQ. In this stage, there are two  main steps:    1. Gather and evaluate your material  2. Outline the content of your report     For Step 1, you are not yet concerned directly about the content of your actual report. Much  needs to be done before you decide on what content gets into your report.    For Step 2, you are now concerned with how to shape the content of your report. Usually, this  is what people refer to as the organizing stage of report writing. However, before you can even  organize the content of your report, much work has to be done to justify why you are using  some particular content and not another, and why you are presenting it in the manner you  want it to be.    So, organizing the content of your writing demands much work from you. This does not only  mean much work in the physical sense, but also much work in the mental and cognitive sense.  You will see later that each main step requires different thinking and analytical skills. You will  realize that report writing is not just a writing task. Ultimately, report writing is a critical  thinking exercise.  9 | P a g e   Centre for English Language Communication  National University of Singapore   

 



    ather your material    After you have formulated your PPQ, you will then need to  decide how to gather material for your PPQ. Such material takes  the form of information and data.    To gather your material, you must go back to your key questions  and ask yourself what information‐getting or research tools you  need to be able to answer these questions. In other words, how  can you find information or source for data to answer your questions? Do you need to  interview people? Do you need to go to the library? Is the information you need available in the  internet? Therefore, it is important to know what are some of the most common research tools  used to answer research questions. These commonly used tools are:    ~Focus Group    ~Observation                             ~Interview     ~Questionnaire                              ~Ethnography              ~Document search 

In many reports, including the one you will be writing, some material has been identified for  you to use. So what you need to do is to determine the soundness of the material based on  your PPQ. It is possible that your PPQ will render some parts or information in your available  material relevant, while other parts irrelevant.    Observation  As the term suggests, observation involves watching or seeing what is happening to people,  objects or events and making a systematic record of this information. For example, if you would  like to find out whether the current frequency of the BTC shuttle bus during off‐peak hours is  cost‐effective, observation can be used to determine the average number of  students and staff who take the shuttle bus between 2‐4pm every weekday.     Observation may be the only method for recording a particular phenomenon  which you wish to investigate, e.g., physical activity, company process, human  behavior.       Focus Group   ...
tracking img