Homonyms in English and Their Specific Features

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CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER I.
1.1 WORDS IDENTICAL IN SOUND-FORM BUT DIFFERENT IN MEANING ARE TRADITIONALLY TERMED HOMONYMOUS 1.2 Classification of homonyms
1.3 Diachronically approach of homonyms
1.4 Synchronically approach in studying homonyms
CHAPTER II.
2.1 ETYMOLOGICAL AND SEMANTIC CRITERIA IN POLYSEMY AND HOMONYMY 2.2 Modern methods of investigating homonyms
2.3 The two main sources of homonymy are:
2.4 Polysemy and Homonymy: Etymological and Semantic Criteria 2.5 Typological analysis of homonymy and polysemy
in three languages
III. CONCLUSION
IV. THE LIST OF USED LITERATURE

INTRODUCTION
The tasks and purposes of the work
The theme of my course work sounds as following: “Homonyms in English and their Specific Features”. This course work can be characterized by the following: The actuality of this work caused by several important points. We seem to say that the appearance of new, homonymic meanings is one of the main trends in development of Modern English, especially in its colloquial layer, which, in its turn at high degree is supported by development of modern informational technologies and simplification of alive speech. So the significance of our work can be proved by the following reasons: a) Studying of homonyms of words is one of the developing branches of lexicology nowadays. b) Homonyms reflect the general trend of simplification of a language. c) Homonymic meanings of words are closely connected with the development of modern informational technologies. d) Being a developing branch of linguistics it requires a special attention of teachers to be adequated to their specialization in English. e) The investigation of homonyms and their differentiation with polysemantic words is not being still investigated in the sufficient degree and this problem is still waiting for its investigator. Our qualification work is one another attempt to investigate this problem.

The main items of the work.
Words identical in sound-form but different in meaning are traditionally termed homonymous. Modern English is exceptionally rich in homonymous words and word-forms. It is held that languages where short words abound have more homonyms than those where longer words are prevalent. Therefore it is sometimes suggested that abundance of homonyms in Modern English is to be accounted for by the monosyllabic structure of the commonly used English words. [10,72] Not only words but other linguistic units may be homonymous. Here, however, we are concerned with the homonymy of words and word-forms only, so we shall not touch upon the problem of homonymous affixes or homonymous phrases. When analyzing different cases of homonymy we find that some words are homonymous in all their forms, i.e. homonymy of the paradigms of two or more different words as, e.g., in seal!—'a sea animal' and seal [6,34]—'a design printed on paper by means of a stamp'. The paradigm "seal, seal's, seals, seals'" is identical for both of them and gives no indication of whether it is sea or seal that we are analyzing. In other cases, e.g. seal—'a sea animal' and (to) seal—'to close tightly', we see that although some individual word-forms are homonymous, the whole of the paradigm is not identical. Compare, for instance, the paradigms:

|seal |(to)seal3 | |seal |seal | |seal's |seals | |seals |sealed | |seals' |sealing, etc |

It is easily observed that only some of the word-forms (e.g. seal, seals, etc.) are homonymous, whereas others (e.g. sealed, sealing) are not. In such cases we cannot speak of homonymous words but...
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