Employability Skills

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Guidelines for Implementing
Wisconsin’s Employability Skills
Certificate Program

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Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
Tony Evers, PhD, State Superintendent
Madison, Wisconsin

This publication is available from:

Career and Technical Education Team
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
125 S. Webster Street
P. O. Box 7841
Madison, WI 53707-7841
608 / 267-0360
http://www.dpi.state.wi.us/dpi/dlsis/let/cteskills.html

The Career and Technical Education Team would like to express its sincere appreciation to the many individuals from local school districts, Cooperative Educational Service Agencies, the Technical College System, University of Wisconsin System, business, industry, and labor representatives, and the Department of Public Instruction for their time, effort and expertise in developing Wisconsin’s Cooperative Education Skill Standards Certificate Program.

Revised September 2005

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, age, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, or physical, mental, emotional or learning disability.

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Printed on recycled paper.
Table of Contents
Section I: Employability Skills Certificate Program Description Introduction 6
General Program Design 6
Local Program Eligibility 7
Local Program Requirements 8
Selection of Students 8
Partner Expectations 8
Student Assessment 9

Section II: Employability Skills Certificate Program Registration Registration Information12

Section III: Work-Based Learning Elements
Work-Based Learning Overview14
Workplace Mentoring14

Section IV: Appendices
A: SCANS Skill Competencies19
B: Definitions of the Competencies20
C: SCANS Foundational Skills22
D: Definitions: The Foundation23
E. Classroom Activities Integrating SCANS Competencies into Curriculum25 F: Sample Training Agreement27
G: Example of an Individual Career Plan28
H: Workplace Mentor Training32
I: Questions and Answers33

|Section |I |

Introduction
General Program Design
Local Program Eligibility
Local Program Requirements
Selection of Students
Partner Expectations
Student Assessment
Introduction

Mastery of employability skills is essential for all students, because virtually all students will one-day go to work. National studies indicate that 80% of all students work at some time during their high school careers. Wisconsin-based research indicates a similar statistic (Green Bay Education Association, 1989). Nationally, secondary schools offer a wide variety of school-supervised, work-based learning programs as a part of the curriculum which provide credits towards graduation and/or skill attainment credentials. Similarly, Wisconsin schools provide a variety of school-supervised learning experiences that help students prepare for their life's work and offer credits towards graduation and/or skill attainment credentials. In particular, school-based programs such as Youth Apprenticeship, Cooperative Education, Work Experience, Internships, Service Learning and others provide valuable career development experiences for young people and some provide state certification of the skills students develop.

In Wisconsin, only a small percentage of high school students who are working are involved in any of the school-supervised or state certified work experiences. The majority get jobs on their own where the work they do has little or no connection to what they do in school. To quote Laurence Steinberg, “Most students work to satisfy personal needs in jobs that offer few opportunities for learning and that have little, if any,...
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