500 Words

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1. Paul Roberts draws us in to his essay, "How to Say Nothing in 500 Words," by presenting us with a relatable situation. This is an effective technique for maintaining the attention of the audience because it shows the writer knows where we are coming from. Once this connection has been established we may find it easier to believe the material that the writer presents us with.

2. Because the student doesn't hold a strong a opinion on the essay's subject matter he begins by leaning towards his instructors feelings on the topic. Once the student has an introduction and body he finds himself falling short of the 500 word requirement. He builds upon the ideas he's already stated and throws in a weak conclusion… and in Robert's words, "when you retype it, you can make the margins a little wider." I don't find this scenario to be exaggerated. Poor time management combined with little to no interest in the subject matter will result in poor writing. I've found myself pushing the spacing between the title and body of the essay, double spacing my headers, and cutting out spacing on the bottom of the page in order to meet an essays page length requirement. I have yet to fool an instructor that cares and have been graded appropriately for my uncouth attempts.

3. The paper deserves nothing higher than a "D" considering it is a college level English course, the student didn't really try, the student may have produced good work in the past (this paper is crap in comparison), and that the instructor may have been in a terrible mood while reaching for the bottom of a stack of papers reeking of redundancy.

4. Roberts ability to hold the readers attention goes back to the first question: "How does this author's opening draw us in?" It is because it is relatable. My instructors, my peers, and I have all gone through what is described throughout this entire essay at least once through our education.

5. The author addresses the concern of of using a cliched argument...
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