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A Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King

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A Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King
Martin Luther King wrote "A letter from Birmingham jail" in response to a published statement by eight fellow ministers from Alabama who violently critiqued King for association and involvement in the protest march against discrimination in Birmingham. King's letter was an effort to defend himself from allegations and to criticize white moderates and church. Starting in the first lines of the letter, Martin Luther King tries to discard the denunciation of being an outsider in Birmingham. He states that he was invited to Birmingham and had organizational connections as the president of Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Furthermore, Martin Luther King did not count himself to be an outsider due to the fact that all people who live within bounds of the United States of America could not be pronounced as outsiders.
In reference to allegations that the protests were precocious, Martin Luther King states several reasons why this was a suitable time for direct action. Originally, discussions with Birmingham's economic public did not give correct results and suppliers did not remove mortifying racial signs from the stores. This became one of the motives that led to the rally. The Easter holiday was the second major shopping season and was elected by the protesters for direct-exploit program because it was the best time to bring burden on the merchants. King explains that the action was stalled several times due to impending elections but demonstrators felt that the action could not be delayed any longer. Then, as Martin Luther King makes clear, protesters did not give a new Birmingham government time to react, because the newly elected Birmingham mayor Albert Boutwell was a segregationist just like his forerunner, Mr. Connor. Finally, King expresses that African Americans were waiting for this instant for more than 340 years and that it was more than sufficient.
The next claim that Martin Luther King tries to disregard was explanation of him as a

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