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The Proletariat: The Communist Manifesto

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The Proletariat: The Communist Manifesto
Samuel Aldaco
Mr. Allen
English III
5/10/17
Proletariat The origin and role of the proletariat in fostering the end of exploitative, class-based society is discussed by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels in their seminal work The Communist Manifesto. Marx and Engels advance communism as the doctrine that outlines the proletariat revolution and liberation. In their prediction of the downfall of capitalism and the victory of socialism and eventually, communism, Marx and Engels conducted a historical analysis of the contradictions between the proletariat and bourgeoisie. The proletariat is a class that evolved out of the societal and economic conditions of the Industrial Revolution. The proletariat is defined in the Manifesto as "a class of laborers, who live only so long as they find work, and who find work
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Unlike capitalism who revolted against the feudal lords to advance their power and position in society, the proletariat, being property less, is the only class who can launch a revolution without the taint of self-interest. A proletarian revolution will usher in a socialist society where there is state ownership of the means of production. Marx believed that capitalism contained the seeds of its own destruction. He described how the wealth of the bourgeoisie depended on the work of the proletariat. Therefore, capitalism requires an underclass. But Marx predicted that the continued exploitation of this underclass would create great resentment. Eventually the proletariat would lead a revolution against the bourgeoisie. The slavery has a lot to do with the proletarians, because of the outside standings against them avoiding everything and counting as a thing and not with the society. while the proletarian belongs to a higher stage of social development and, himself, stands on a higher social level than the

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