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The Evil Eye

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The Evil Eye
Creative non fiction describes true experiences and is based on true facts and events, unlike many other genres. Racism is depicted during multiple occasions in “The Evil Eye” written by Wanda Coleman. The writer tells stories that have impacted her by using creative non-fiction as an attempt to raise our awareness of racism. Coleman is married to a white man, and not only are they judged by the people of his race, but by her people as well. “… Those who marry across barriers of class, colour and religion is not tolerated in the streets but discreetly tolerated in a sophisticated setting.” (236) Coleman discusses how she cannot leave her home without feeling as though she is being scrutinized by the people of her town. This short story has more meaning than what we see on the surface. This excerpt of creative non-fiction describes the hardship that the coloured people have experienced, and still continue to experience today. Racism is not as prominent as it once was, yet it still affects the lives of many all around the world. Coleman and her husband have become accustomed to feeling the judgement of the white people, but to their surprise, the coloured people are racist towards them as well. “We’re unaware that we’ve become an issue until we sense the laserlike stare of a young black man dissecting us as we crisscross the dance floor.” (236) The coloured man could not believe his eyes when he sees Coleman with her white husband, and he could not help but give her “The Evil Eye”. This is an issue that occurred whenever the couple left their home; Coleman is describing the conflicts that many coloured people are faced with. Coleman and her husband could not leave their home without feeling discriminated against since they received “The Evil Eye” from countless people wherever they went simply because of who they chose to share their lives with. “Imagine yourself - if you dare - in my skin, unable to go anywhere, day or night, without anticipating trouble.”

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