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school segregation
Increasing segregation in American schools today.

As I walk through our schools and communit people living and socializing where they feel it is most affordable and comfortable. Individuals in society live to their own standards, producing their own living conditions. I was interested in writing about how the racial segregation came about in America at first. However, I noticed that the topic is too broad and after reading several articles regarding racial segregation in America, I noticed how interesting that this racial issue have caused an effect to the education system around the states. Schools around the United States are getting more and more heavily segregated by different races which could also cause an imbalance of income groups. For example, in New York City, we can see that the majority of the black people or minorities would prefer to live in areas such as Harlem or Brooklyn which relatively have a lower cost of living compared to Manhattan or downtown.

Educational segregation was once widely viewed as a result of white racism. Roberts v. Boston was the first case to challenge segregation in public schools. In this case, five-year-old Sarah Roberts was barred from her local primary school because she was black, and was forced to travel a great distance to get to school every morning. Her father sued the city of Boston to allow his daughter to attend a school in their neighborhood. The case was heard by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court on Dec. 4, 1849. The following April, the court ruled that school segregation was constitutional. However, the fight to end public school segregation did not end there. This example shows that educational segregation had been around for a long time and it is not getting any better. Besides that, it is known that public schools in one of the most racially diverse states in the country, New York are the most highly segregated, with minority and poor students

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