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Still Separate, Still Unequal Analysis

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Still Separate, Still Unequal Analysis
Still Separate, Still Unequal
“Still Separate, Still Unequal”, written by Jonathan Kozol, describes the reality of urban public schools and the isolation and segregation the students there face today. Jonathan Kozol illustrates the grim reality of the inequality that African American and Hispanic children face within todays public education system. In this essay, Kozol shows the reader, with alarming statistics and percentages, just how segregated Americas urban schools have become. He also brings light to the fact that suburban schools, with predominantly white students, are given far better funding and a much higher quality education, than the poverty stricken schools of the urban neighborhoods.
Jonathan Kozol brings our attention to the obvious growing trend of racial segregation within America’s urban and inner city schools. He creates logical support by providing frightening statistics to his claims stemming from his research and observations of different school environments. He also provides emotional support by sharing the stories and experiences of the teachers and students, as well as maintaining strong credibility with his informative tone throughout the entire essay.
Within this essay, there are many uses of rhetorical appeals including logos, pathos, and ethos. Jonathan Kozol uses reasoning, or logos, to prove that the education systems of today are still as separated and unequal for students based on the color of their skin or their race, as they were 50 years ago. An example of this is when Kozol informs us of the exact percentages of students by race in schools across the country, “In Chicago 87% of public-school enrolment was black or Hispanic; less than 10% was white. In Washington D.C., 94% black or Hispanic; to less than 5% white. In New York City, nearly three quarters of the students were black or Hispanic.” (Kozol 202) Using statistics and facts really make this issue apparent, and show us just how real this problem in America is. Another



Cited: Kozol, Jonathan. Still Separate, Still Unequal. Rereading America: Cultural Contexts for Critical Thinking and Writing. 9th ed. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martins, 2013. 201-18. Print.

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