Practical Book Review One: Why Don't We Listen Better

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Practical Book Review One:

Why Don’t We Listen Better

Presented to

Prof. Max Mills, M.Div, PH.D

Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary

Lynchburg, VA

In Partial Fulfillment

Of The Requirements For The Course

PACO 500 Introduction to Pastoral Counseling

By

Marcus A. Banks-Bey

February 12, 2012

Petersen, James C. 2011. Why Don’t We Listen Better? Communicating and Connecting in Relationships. Portland, OR: Petersen Publications.

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My Summary

Petersen (2011) provides a practical guide for readers who are interested in increasing their ability to communicate amongst others in a multitude of settings which include but are not limited to business, familial, and romantic. Within this book, Petersen presents common, yet overseen communication errors which many individuals become conflicted with. With these common errors, Petersen then provides his view on how to overcome particular barriers which prohibit positive growth amongst those who seek to effectively communicate with one another. Petersen helps the reader understand that what results in a breakdown of communication is in part, due to the fact that the individuals involved in the process, fail to see the emotion behind what is being verbalized. This emotion however becomes translated as an attack, or defense to an attack which is perceived as one in the same thing (p.108). The theories which Petersen has developed, thus presents as a means to introduce, and illustrate common communication pitfalls begins with the notion of what he calls “The Flat Brain Theory of Emotions” (p. 10). I translated this theory to be a means of understanding the common errors which take place when an individual’s combined thoughts, and emotions, fail to convey the message which they are attempting to impart upon whom they are communicating. The messages within the brain, get construed with the emotions which are give us sensations at the pit of

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