In What Ways Did Climate And Geography Influence The Development Of The British Colonies

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Geography and climate were the primary factors in shaping the development of the British colonies in North America. The geography had an enormous effect on how the British survived, made a profit, and the quality of their lives. The climate and geography was different in the south, the middle, and the northern colonies, however it had both positive and negative effects on the English colonies in the New World during the 1600’s.

In the north, the New England colonist did not have an easy time living off the land. The land was rocky, covered with forest, the soil was hard and not usable, and the growing season was short. For these reasons, farming was very difficult and sometimes impossible. Because of this the settlers had to find other means of making a profit and feeding themselves. So, instead of making their living by farming, New Englanders became loggers, fishers, whalers, and shipbuilders, using the available ocean and rivers. The climate was also another problem the settlers had to face. The climate in the summer months was not too hot, which prevented the spread of diseases. However the winter months were freezing and many people died of starvation and diseases.
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The land in the middle colonies was very fertile and therefore was well suited for farming. Because of the rich soil, the middle colonies became major exporters of wheat and other grains. The area later got the nickname the Breadbasket Colonies because they produced the majority of the bread and wheat of all the colonies. The climate of the middle colonies was very good, with a milder climate then the other

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