Preview

Federalist 10 Argument Analysis

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1116 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Federalist 10 Argument Analysis
Published on November of 1987, Federalist 10 is considered one of the most treasured constitutional documents in American History. James Madison starts this paper off stating that in collaborative governments, faction is a menacing virtue. “AMONG the numerous advantages promised by a well constructed Union, none deserves to be more accurately developed than its tendency to break and control the violence of faction. The friend of popular governments never finds himself so much alarmed for their character and fate, as when he contemplates their propensity to this dangerous vice”(Madison, Paragraph 1). The vital advantage is attaining the ability to either vanquish it or control it. Factions were groups of citizens with interests that were irreconcilable …show more content…
Madison states, "The latent causes of faction are thus sown in the nature of man," (Madison, Paragraph 5) so the solution is to control their effects. He makes an argument on how this is not feasible in a moral democracy but practical in a republic. Effects of a faction vary depending on whether the faction is a majority or minority faction. Madison argues that the only strenuous effects to control will come from majority factions. He states that the concept of popular sovereignty should keep minority factions from acquiring an influence. “But the most common and durable source of factions has been the various and unequal distribution of property. Those who hold and those who are without property have ever formed distinct interests in society” (Madison, Paragraph 5). However he argues that undesirable passions can spread from a small size to a majority faction fairly quickly. “. The regulation of these various and interfering interests forms the principal task of modern legislation, and involves the spirit of party and faction in the necessary and ordinary operations of the government” (Madison, Paragraph …show more content…
“…the smaller the number of individuals composing a majority, and the smaller the compass within which they are placed, the more easily will they concert and execute their plans of oppression. Extend the sphere, and you take in a greater variety of parties and interests; you make it less probable that a majority of the whole will have a common motive to invade the rights of other citizens” (Madison, Paragraph 14). Even though Madison argued for a large and diverse republic, the Federalist Papers recognized the need for a balance to preserve fairness and justice. They wanted a republic diverse enough to prevent faction but with enough commonality to preserve unity among the states. “In the extent and proper structure of the Union, therefore, we behold a republican remedy for the diseases most incident to republican government. And according to the degree of pleasure and pride we feel in being republicans, ought to be our zeal in cherishing the spirit and supporting the character of Federalists” (Madison, Paragraph

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    James Madison begins his famous Federalist 10 paper by stating that a strong argument in favor of the Constitution is the fact that it creates a government in control of the chaos, violence, and destruction caused by the factions in society. James Madison defines a faction as group of people who collectively work together to protect and promote their own economic interests and political opinions. In my opinion, these factions are inevitable, and this because of human nature and attraction theory. When people hold certain ideologies, possess specific amounts of wealth, and possess different amounts of property, they will most likely associate themselves with people who are most similar to them. Factions in society are completely opposite and…

    • 295 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    In The Constitution: A Minority Document Charles Beard argues that the Constitution was written by a group of people who had certain specific economic and political interests. Beard states that the Constitution didn’t reflect the interests of the general population. Beards mentions that the framers largest fear was the corruption of a democratic government. Those with out property were usually excluded from voting, and elections often occurred indirectly to limit the power of the uneducated public. The Constitution was intended to get rid of the character of evil. Beard also states that the Convention members knew from their personal economic affairs the precise results which the new government that they were setting up was designed to attain. It also ensures a division of society into different interests and party’s. Beard also writes that Madison makes the underlying political science of constitution in the tenth number. Here he lays down, in no uncertain language, the principle that the first and elemental concern of every government is economic. The first objective of government is the protection of the diversity in the faculties of men from which the rights of property originate. The most common source of factions is the unequal distribution of property. An unequal distribution of property is inevitable, and from its contending factions will rise in the state. To secure the public good the contending classes cannot be eliminated and their interests are bound to be reflected in politics, the only way out lies in making it difficult for enough contending interests to fuse into a…

    • 258 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In the first Federalist paper, No. 10 written by James Madison, is an informative piece of writing warning us against the dangers of having such a strong, powerful government and what ways that we can break away from the “Violent Factions”. (Paragraph 1, Line 3.) As Madison goes on, he goes into great detail on the two ways of defeating the creation of factions. One would be to get rid of liberty and freedom all together, which is impossible to complete. The second way to get ride of the factions would be “by giving to every citizen the same opinions, the same passions, and the same interests.” (Paragraph 4, line 2.) Both of those methods are equally unwise as it is impossible to complete. As it is hardwired into…

    • 388 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Madison made his concern of tyranny known especially in the 10th Federalist Paper, with some mention in his other papers, and writings including the Constitution in which his contributions were heavily influenced by his concerns. Factions were a legitimate threat, and the greatest of the potential evils for the United States because the good of the public would be disregarded by the majority faction, and they would make hasty decisions that would harm the country. The greatest cause for factions as described by Madison in the tenth federalist paper is different degrees of possession of…

    • 1153 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    hi list of my future

    • 472 Words
    • 3 Pages

    2. Madison states that factions can have many causes for forming. What cause does he…

    • 472 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Indeed, it was James Madison in Federalist 10 that said that factions are groups that unite to serve selfish goals, not the national interest. It is necessary to control them through constitutional means, one of which is the creation of a large republic, which helps disperse factions and to reduce their influence on the national legislature. Madison in his paper is warning the contractures of the constitution that factions are the ultimate rival of the government. They will try to force upon government their own ideals instead of the more important issues of national interest.…

    • 2515 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    James Madison begins his paper by stating a strong argument for the Constitution is the fact that it gives the government the capability to control the violence and the damage of factions. He says, "Among the numerous advantages promised by a well-constructed Union, none deserve to be more accurately developed than its tendency to break and control the violence of faction". Factions, described by James Madison, are groups of people who get together to protect their special interest and opinions.…

    • 392 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    “In The Federalist No. 51...James Madison wrote in defense of a proposed national constitution that would establish a structure of checks and balances between the different departments of the government and, as a result, constrain the government’s oppression of the public” (R. Higgs). James Madison advocated for a strong federal government rather than weak government with a strong state government. A strong federal allowed the states to be united with the sacrifice of being government by a powerful few. Anti federalists argued this was similar to the monarchy they had just escaped. Federalists also wanted to ratify the Constitution to protect the rights of the people by constraining the powers of each of the government branches. (Levine and…

    • 493 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In response to the formidable factions fear, Madison explained in Federalist Paper 10 how the proposed government would be able to control the effects of any one faction or group. He stated that the larger the government, the better to control factions as it would be more difficult to deceive all the people, and there would be more factions in a larger government and nation, effectively weakening them. In addition to the faction fear, Madison addressed the public’s concern about the strength of the presented government by depicting the checks and balances that were to be implemented. Madison justified the need of a strong, central government by illustrating the practicality of checks and balances and a representative republic…

    • 565 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    During the early years of our nation, there was not a great deal of brotherly love, peace and agreement that could be found in the government. Two political parties had evolved that possessed interests that spanned both ends of every argument and political idea. The Federalists believed that the nation should have a very centralized government and stood firm that this would bring about the most order and prosperity. To the contrary, Republicans wanted the rights to stay with the people and States and therefore felt that the federal government should have little control to protect the rights of the people. Many historical documents record the struggles between the two parties. The main struggles revolved around three areas. The first area…

    • 866 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The folk behind the Federalist movement included farmers on the frontier, businessmen near navigable water or involved in interstate trade, minorities whose rights were unprotected by the states, and slaveholders who realized the benefits of the Three Fifths Clause. Furthermore, many of the important faces of the American Revolution, including George Washington and Ben Franklin, were Federalists and helped sway a public that held them up to be godly figures of early republic. Madison’s anonymous papers such as Federalist 10 helped the party to dominate a Federalist-friendly press and have their ideas spread throughout the country. In Federalist 10, Madison turns a what Antifederalists view as negative aspect of the Constitution, a consolidated government over an immense land, and turns it into a remarkable bonus that avoids any faction getting an upper hand. Madison considers that men of a majority will oppress the minority if “the impulse and opportunity coincide” and that “neither moral nor religious motives can be relied on as an adequate control” to these urges. Therefore, a government that is divided up into many factions can have no one ruling majority and in turn, no group will predominantly sway to oppress a minority. Madison then continues on to say how a “pure democracy” of a small number of citizens can “admit of no cure for the mischiefs of faction” because on such a small scale, nearly everyone, besides the minority, will belong to the same faction and in turn, the majority. To combat the problems of a strong majority, Madison argues that the elected officials will “discern the true interest of their country” and will avoid the temptation to succumb to the needs of “temporary or partial considerations.” Madison worked to find a balance in the number of representatives…

    • 1803 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Federalist Papers

    • 782 Words
    • 4 Pages

    What are the “two methods of removing the causes of factions”? What does Madison think of these two approaches? Is he in favor of removing the causes?…

    • 782 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Madison asserts factions are detrimental to the government because they tend to cause chaotic discourse between those involved, thus not accomplishing anything. Citizens that are concerned about their government do not want factions, and they are willing to lawfully combat against them. Madison also asserts that governments should be admired, but he acknowledges that it would be incorrect to say governments are absolutely flawless. He also acknowledges how people find it unfair that the majority tends to be favored over the minority. The majority is not always right because it…

    • 316 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    1998 Dbq Essay

    • 1116 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Following the making of the Constitution, James Madison brought forth the warning of political factions or parties as we know today in one of his many inputs into the Federalist Papers. As the Constitution was offered among the states to be ratified, two groups rose in effect of differing opinions on the document, and these two groups were known as the supporters, Federalists, and the opposition, Antifederalists. After eventual political compromise and the beginning of a new government, these parties did not disappear, yet instead became much stronger. In one corner stood the Federalists who believed in broad constructionism of the Constitution and used it to enlarge the size of the national government and its’ powers. In the other corner stood the Antifederalists who soon became the Democratic-Republicans, and in opposition to the Federalist believed in a strict constructionism of the Constitution and often supporting the power of the state and its’ independence.…

    • 1116 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    1. According to Madison, why should a government not try to remove the causes of factions? Madison believed that these factions would have a negative effect on individual freedoms and liberties.…

    • 157 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays