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Compare And Contrast Federalist Paper 10 And 51

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Compare And Contrast Federalist Paper 10 And 51
The Federalist Papers, written collaboratively by Madison, Hamilton, and Jay, were intended to support Federalism. Federalist Papers 10 and 51, specifically, endorse the idea of a large, layered, republic government. Federalist Paper 10 was written by Madison and focuses on factions and how a republic government would be more effective than a state-run government. Federalist Paper 51, weather written by Madison or Hamilton, puts emphasis on defending the Constitution and discusses separated powers and checks and balances. Both Federalist Paper 10 and 51, along with the rest, are in support and defense of the Constitution. There is always a purpose for papers such as these, and the purpose here was to allay the fears of the people; the fear that this new Constitution wouldn’t work, the fear that there was no solution to the political instability the Articles of Confederation had, and the fear that the government would be too strong or controlling. The political instability at the time scared people because factions, (groups with common political interests that forced their opinions on others while disregarding …show more content…
In response to the formidable factions fear, Madison explained in Federalist Paper 10 how the proposed government would be able to control the effects of any one faction or group. He stated that the larger the government, the better to control factions as it would be more difficult to deceive all the people, and there would be more factions in a larger government and nation, effectively weakening them. In addition to the faction fear, Madison addressed the public’s concern about the strength of the presented government by depicting the checks and balances that were to be implemented. Madison justified the need of a strong, central government by illustrating the practicality of checks and balances and a representative republic

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