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Daimyo's Significant Role In Japanese Society

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Daimyo's Significant Role In Japanese Society
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Daimyo were very important to society in Japan as they had power over land and were the people that held most of it. They had many rights and too much power that it caused many conflicts between the higher social classes. Daimyo gained most of their income through taxation and the items that he collected from farmers and merchants. They had a significant role within the military and were the authority over the samurai. They immensely influenced the land they owned and the society living on it.

Food
As the daimyo were wealthy they would afford top quality food and often ate the best food in the land. Some of the dishes they often ate were tempura seafoods, Zoni (rice cake soup) and miso soup. Unsurprisingly, most dishes contained seafood and rice. Seafood was either cooked or eaten raw like sashimi or on top of rice. Popular dishes included octopus, squid, tuna, salmon, crab, lobster,
…show more content…
The word ‘Shinto’ primarily means the way of the gods. They believe in the basic life-force called kami and it is the source of human life and nature. Worshippers of the religion have faith that kami cannot be explained by words or misunderstood. They believe in multiple gods such as Izanagi and Izanami, they are believed to have created Japan.
Zen Buddhism highlights the significance of self-discipline and control. The main purpose in Zen Buddhism is to accomplish a moment of enlightenment, when the truth finally speaks to you- this is called satori. Satori can be achieved mentally and physically through meditation and physical discipline. They also believe that you could obtain enlightenment from observing nature.
There were also an exception with the conversion of a few daimyo to ‘Kirishitan’ after the arrival of Portuguese. The people who converted were looked down upon as the religion had been forbidden and the Japanese had viewed as a threat to their

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